Omnicell, Inc.
OMNICELL, Inc (Form: 10-Q, Received: 05/10/2011 06:05:28)

Table of Contents

 

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, DC 20549

 


 

FORM 10-Q

 

(Mark One)

 

x       QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the quarterly period ended March 31, 2011

 

OR

 

o          TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the transition period from             to

 

Commission File Number 000-33043

 


 

Omnicell, Inc.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Delaware

 

94-3166458

(State or other jurisdiction

 

(I.R.S. Employer

of incorporation or organization)

 

Identification No.)

 

1201 Charleston Road

Mountain View, CA 94043

(650) 251-6100

(Address, including zip code, of registrant’s principal executive
offices and registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

 


 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes  x  No  o

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes  o  No  o

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):

 

Large accelerated filer  o

 

Accelerated filer  x

 

 

 

Non-accelerated filer  o

 

Smaller reporting company  o

(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)

 

 

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes  o  No  x

 

The number of shares of Registrant’s common stock (par value $0.001) outstanding as of May 2, 2011 was 33,119,177.

 

 

 



Table of Contents

 

OMNICELL, INC.

 

FORM 10-Q

 

Table of C ontents

 

 

 

Page
number

PART I—FINANCIAL INFORMATION

3

Item 1.

Financial Statements:

3

 

Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets as of March 31, 2011 (unaudited) and December 31, 2010

3

 

Unaudited Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations for the three months ended March 31, 2011 and 2010

4

 

Unaudited Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the three months ended March 31, 2011 and 2010

5

 

Notes to Unaudited Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements

6

Item 2.

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

19

 

 

 

Item 3.

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk

27

Item 4.

Controls and Procedures

27

 

 

 

PART II—OTHER INFORMATION

28

Item 1.

Legal Proceedings

28

Item 1A.

Risk Factors

28

Item 2.

Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds

39

 

 

 

Item 3.

Defaults Upon Senior Securities

39

Item 4.

(Removed and Reserved)

39

Item 5.

Other Information

39

Item 6.

Exhibits

40

 

 

 

SIGNATURES

41

INDEX TO EXHIBITS

42

 

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Table of Contents

 

PART 1 — FINANCIAL INFORMATION

 

Item 1.  Financial Statements

 

OMNICELL, INC.

 

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

(In thousands)

 

 

 

March 31,

 

December 31,

 

 

 

2011

 

2010

 

 

 

(unaudited)

 

(1)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ASSETS

 

 

 

 

 

Current assets:

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents

 

$

173,669

 

$

175,635

 

Short-term investments

 

8,109

 

8,074

 

Accounts receivable, net of allowances of $456 and $497 at March 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010, respectively

 

39,795

 

42,732

 

Inventories

 

15,399

 

9,785

 

Prepaid expenses

 

11,776

 

11,959

 

Deferred tax assets

 

13,052

 

13,052

 

Other current assets

 

6,337

 

7,266

 

Total current assets

 

268,137

 

268,503

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Property and equipment, net

 

15,344

 

14,351

 

Non-current net investment in sales-type leases

 

9,251

 

9,224

 

Goodwill

 

28,543

 

28,543

 

Other intangible assets

 

4,533

 

4,672

 

Non-current deferred tax assets

 

10,103

 

9,566

 

Other assets

 

9,501

 

8,365

 

Total assets

 

$

345,412

 

$

343,224

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY

 

 

 

 

 

Current liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

Accounts payable

 

$

13,870

 

$

13,242

 

Accrued compensation

 

6,382

 

7,731

 

Accrued liabilities

 

8,734

 

8,684

 

Deferred service revenue

 

18,524

 

16,788

 

Deferred gross profit

 

11,009

 

11,719

 

Total current liabilities

 

58,519

 

58,164

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Long-term deferred service revenue

 

18,897

 

19,171

 

Other long-term liabilities

 

650

 

675

 

Total liabilities

 

78,066

 

78,010

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stockholders’ equity:

 

 

 

 

 

Total stockholders’ equity

 

267,346

 

265,214

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity

 

$

345,412

 

$

343,224

 

 


(1)  Information derived from our December 31, 2010 audited Consolidated Financial Statements.

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

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OMNICELL, INC.

 

UNAUDITED CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

(In thousands, except per share data)

 

 

 

Three Months
Ended March 31,

 

 

 

2011

 

2010

 

Revenues:

 

 

 

 

 

Product

 

$

42,575

 

$

42,295

 

Services and other revenues

 

14,585

 

11,865

 

Total revenue

 

57,160

 

54,160

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cost of revenues:

 

 

 

 

 

Cost of product revenues

 

17,836

 

19,265

 

Cost of services and other revenues

 

7,674

 

7,309

 

Total cost of revenues

 

25,510

 

26,574

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gross profit

 

31,650

 

27,586

 

Operating expenses:

 

 

 

 

 

Research and development

 

4,840

 

4,565

 

Selling, general and administrative

 

25,781

 

21,512

 

Total operating expenses

 

30,621

 

26,077

 

Income from operations

 

1,029

 

1,509

 

Other income, net

 

54

 

74

 

Income before provision for income taxes

 

1,083

 

1,583

 

Provision for income taxes

 

413

 

604

 

Net income

 

$

670

 

$

979

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net income per share:

 

 

 

 

 

Basic

 

$

0.02

 

$

0.03

 

Diluted

 

$

0.02

 

$

0.03

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weighted average shares outstanding:

 

 

 

 

 

Basic

 

33,184

 

32,207

 

Diluted

 

34,098

 

33,153

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

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OMNICELL, INC.

 

UNAUDITED CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

(In thousands)

 

 

 

Three Months
Ended March 31,

 

 

 

2011

 

2010

 

Cash flows from operating activities:

 

 

 

 

 

Net income

 

$

670

 

$

979

 

Adjustments to reconcile net income (loss) to net cash provided by (used in) operating activities:

 

 

 

 

 

Depreciation and amortization

 

1,852

 

2,123

 

Provision for receivable allowance

 

(62

)

(50

)

Share-based compensation expense

 

2,392

 

2,156

 

Income tax benefits from employee stock plans

 

801

 

964

 

Excess tax benefits from employee stock plans

 

(921

)

(1,115

)

Provision for excess and obsolete inventories

 

345

 

385

 

Deferred income taxes

 

(537

)

(339

)

Changes in operating assets and liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

Accounts receivable, net

 

2,968

 

808

 

Inventories

 

(5,959

)

(30

)

Prepaid expenses

 

183

 

351

 

Other current assets

 

(512

)

143

 

Net investment in sales-type leases

 

210

 

534

 

Other assets

 

284

 

77

 

Accounts payable

 

628

 

290

 

Accrued compensation

 

(1,349

)

(1,811

)

Accrued liabilities

 

1,250

 

(330

)

Deferred service revenue

 

1,607

 

1,438

 

Deferred gross profit

 

(710

)

2,156

 

Other long-term liabilities

 

(25

)

87

 

Net cash provided by operating activities

 

3,115

 

8,816

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash flows from investing activities:

 

 

 

 

 

Acquisition of intangible assets and intellectual property

 

(24

)

(107

)

Software development for external use

 

(1,823

)

(883

)

Purchases of property and equipment

 

(2,424

)

(1,766

)

Net cash used in investing activities

 

(4,271

)

(2,756

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash flows from financing activities:

 

 

 

 

 

Proceeds from issuance of common stock under employee stock purchase and stock option plans

 

2,998

 

4,206

 

Stock repurchases

 

(4,729

)

 

Excess tax benefits from employee stock plans

 

921

 

1,115

 

Net cash (used in) provided by financing activities

 

(810

)

5,321

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net (decrease) increase in cash and cash equivalents

 

(1,966

)

11,381

 

Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period

 

175,635

 

169,230

 

Cash and cash equivalents at end of period

 

$

173,669

 

$

180,611

 

Supplemental disclosure of non-cash operating activity

 

 

 

 

 

Satisfaction of acquired legal contingency with indemnification asset (Note 2)

 

$

(1,200

)

$

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

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OMNICELL, INC.

 

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(Unaudited)

 

Note 1. Organization & Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

 

Description of the Company.  Omnicell, Inc. (“Omnicell,” “our,” “us,” “we,” or the “Company”) was incorporated in California in 1992 under the name Omnicell Technologies, Inc. and reincorporated in Delaware in 2001 as Omnicell, Inc. Our major products are medication and supply dispensing systems, with related services, which are sold in our principal market, which is the healthcare industry. Our market is primarily located in the United States.

 

Basis of Presentation.   These interim condensed consolidated financial statements are unaudited but reflect, in the opinion of management, all adjustments, consisting of normal recurring adjustments and accruals, necessary to present fairly the financial position of Omnicell and its subsidiaries as of March 31, 2011, and the results of operations and cash flows for the three months ended March 31, 2011 and 2010.  Certain information and footnote disclosures normally included in financial statements prepared in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles (“GAAP”), have been condensed or omitted in accordance with the rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”). These unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements should be read in conjunction with the audited consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes included in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2010.

 

Our results of operations and cash flows for the three months ended March 31, 2011 are not necessarily indicative of results that may be expected for the year ending December 31, 2011, or for any future period.

 

Use of estimates.  The preparation of financial statements in conformity with GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the amounts reported in the financial statements and accompanying notes. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

 

Principles of consolidation.  The condensed consolidated financial statements include the accounts of our wholly-owned subsidiaries. All significant inter-company accounts and transactions have been eliminated in consolidation.

 

In 2010, we completed an acquisition of Pandora Data Systems, Inc. (“Pandora”). The consolidated financial statements include the results of operations from this business combination from September 29, 2010, the date of acquisition. Additional disclosure related to the acquisition is provided in Note 2, “Acquisition.”

 

Reclassifications.  Certain reclassifications have been made to the prior year consolidated statement of cash flows to conform to the current period presentation, including software development for external use as investing cash flows instead of operating cash flows. None of these reclassifications are material to the consolidated financial statements.

 

Fair value of financial instruments.  We value our financial assets and liabilities on a recurring basis using the fair value hierarchy established in Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) 820.

 

ASC 820 describes three levels of inputs that may be used to measure fair value, as follows:

 

Level 1 inputs, which include quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities;

 

Level 2 inputs, which include observable inputs other than Level 1 inputs, such as quoted prices for similar assets or liabilities; quoted prices for identical or similar assets or liabilities in markets that are not active; or other inputs that are observable or can be corroborated by observable market data for substantially the full term of the asset or liability; and

 

Level 3 inputs, which include unobservable inputs that are supported by little or no market activity and that are significant to the fair value of the underlying asset or liability. Level 3 assets and liabilities include those whose fair value measurements are determined using pricing models, discounted cash flow methodologies or similar valuation techniques, as well as significant management judgment or estimation.

 

At March 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010, our financial assets utilizing Level 1 inputs included cash equivalents. For these items, quoted market prices are readily available and fair value approximates carrying value. At March 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010 we had a short term investment in California revenue anticipation notes, the valuation inputs of which are classified as Level 2. We do not currently have any material financial instruments utilizing Level 3 inputs.

 

Classification of marketable securities . Marketable securities for which we have the intent and ability to hold to maturity are classified as Held-to-maturity and are carried at their amortized cost, including accrued interest. At both March 31, 2011 and

 

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December, 31, 2010 we held $8.1 million of non-U.S. Government securities which are classified as Held-to-maturity short-term investments. We do not hold securities for purposes of trading. However, securities held as investments for the indefinite future, pending future spending requirements are classified as Available-for-sale and are carried at their fair value, with any unrealized gain or loss recorded to other comprehensive income until realized. At March 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010 we held $162.6 million and $150.4 million, respectively, of money market mutual funds classified as Available-for-sale cash equivalents.

 

Revenue recognition . We earn revenues from sales of our medication and supply dispensing systems, with related services, which are sold in our principal market, which is the healthcare industry. Our market is primarily located in the United States. Our customer arrangements typically include one or more of the following deliverables:

 

·       Products Software enabled equipment that manages and regulates the storage and dispensing of pharmaceuticals and other medical supplies.

·       Software — Additional software applications that enable incremental functionality of our equipment.

·       Installation — Installation of equipment as integrated systems at customers’ sites.

·       Post-installation technical support — Phone support, on-site service, parts and access to unspecified software upgrades and enhancements, if and when available.

·       Professional services — Other customer services such as training and consulting.

 

We recognize revenue when the earnings process is complete, based upon our evaluation of whether the following four criteria have been met:

 

·       Persuasive evidence of an arrangement.   We use signed customer contracts and signed customer purchase orders as evidence of an arrangement for leases and sales. For service engagements, we use a signed services agreement and a statement of work to evidence an arrangement.

 

·       Delivery has occurred.   Equipment and software product delivery is deemed to occur upon successful installation and receipt of a signed and dated customer confirmation of installation letter providing evidence that we have delivered what a customer ordered. In instances of a customer self-installed installation, product delivery is deemed to have occurred upon receipt of a signed and dated customer confirmation letter. If a sale does not require installation, we recognize revenue on delivery of products to the customer, including transfer of title and risk of loss. We recognize revenue from sales of products to distributors upon delivery since we do not allow for rights of return or refund.

 

We recognize revenue for support services ratably over the related support services contract period. We recognize revenue on training and professional services as they are performed.

 

·       Fee is fixed or determinable.   We assess whether a fee is fixed or determinable at the outset of the arrangement based on the payment terms associated with the transaction. We have established a history of collecting under the original contract without providing concessions on payments, products or services.

 

·       Collection is probable.   We assess the probability of collecting from each customer at the outset of the arrangement based on a number of factors, including the customer’s payment history and its current creditworthiness. If, in our judgment, collection of a fee is not probable, we defer the revenue until the uncertainty is removed, which generally means revenue is recognized upon our receipt of cash payment. Our historical experience has been that collection from our customers is generally probable.

 

In arrangements with multiple deliverables , we recognize revenue for individual delivered items if they have value to the customer on a standalone basis. Effective for new or modified arrangements entered into beginning on January 1, 2011, the date we adopted the new revenue recognition guidance for arrangements with multiple deliverables on a prospective basis, we allocate arrangement consideration at the inception of the arrangement to all deliverables using the relative selling price method. This method requires us to determine the selling price at which each deliverable could be sold if it were sold regularly on a standalone basis. When available, we use vendor-specific objective evidence (“VSOE”) of fair value as the selling price. VSOE represents the price charged for a deliverable when it is sold separately or for a deliverable not yet being sold separately, the price established by management with the relevant authority. We consider VSOE to exist when approximately 80% or more of our standalone sales of an item are priced within a reasonably narrow pricing range (plus or minus 15% of the median rates). We have established VSOE of fair value for our post-installation technical support services and professional services. When VSOE of fair value is not available, third-party evidence (“TPE”) of fair value for similar products and services is acceptable; however, our offerings and market strategy differ from those of our competitors, such that we cannot obtain sufficient comparable information about third parties’ prices. If neither VSOE nor TPE are available, we use our best estimates of selling prices (“BESP”). We determine BESP considering factors such as market

 

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conditions, sales channels, internal costs and product margin objectives, and pricing practices. We regularly review and update our VSOE, TPE and BESP information and obtain formal approval by appropriate levels of management.

 

The relative selling price method allocates total arrangement consideration proportionally to each deliverable on the basis of its estimated selling price. In addition, the amount recognized for any delivered items cannot exceed that which is not contingent upon delivery of any remaining items in the arrangement.

 

We also use the residual method of allocating the arrangement consideration in certain circumstances. Under the residual method, the amount allocated to the undelivered elements equals VSOE of fair value of these elements. Any remaining amounts are attributed to the delivered items and are recognized when those items are delivered. We use the residual method to allocate total arrangement consideration between delivered and undelivered items for any arrangements entered into prior to January 1, 2011, and not subsequently materially-modified, as the use of the residual method is required by software revenue recognition rules that applied to sales of most of our products and services until the adoption of the new revenue recognition guidance. We also use the residual method to allocate revenue between the software products that enable incremental equipment functionality and thus are not deemed to deliver its essential functionality, and the related post-installation technical support, as these products and services continue to be accounted for under software revenue recognition rules.

 

The adoption of the new revenue recognition guidance did not result in changes in what we identify as the individual deliverables to which revenue is allocated, or the timing of revenue recognition related to these individual deliverables. The change in the allocation method from residual to relative selling price did not have a material impact on our financial statements during the three months ended March 31, 2011.  In addition, there is a time lag between when we receive a signed customer purchase order or contract and when we install the products, sometimes as long as one year or more, primarily due to the installation cycles and timing preferences of our customers. As a result, most of the revenue we recognized during the three months ended March 31, 2011 was not subject to the new revenue recognition guidance. In the future periods, we anticipate the cumulative impact of the adoption may increase, as additional arrangements become subject to the new revenue recognition guidance. However, the specific adjustments for any future quarter are not predictable, as they depend on the timing of our backlog shipments and installations and the nature of the orders we receive from new customers.

 

A portion of our sales are made through multi-year lease agreements. We recognize product related revenue under sales-type leases, net of lease execution costs such as post-installation product maintenance and technical support, at the net present value of the lease payment stream once our installation obligations have been met. We optimize cash flows by selling a majority of our non-U.S. government leases to third-party leasing finance companies on a non-recourse basis. We have no obligation to the leasing company once the lease has been sold. Some of our sales-type leases, mostly those relating to U.S. government hospitals, are retained in-house. Interest income in these leases is recognized in product revenue using the interest method.

 

Accounts receivable, net and net investment in sales type leases.     We actively manage our accounts receivable to minimize credit risk. We typically sell to customers for which there is a history of successful collection. New customers are subject to a credit review process, which evaluates the customers’ financial position and ability to pay. We continually monitor and evaluate the collectability of our trade receivables based on a combination of factors. We record specific allowances for doubtful accounts when we become aware of a specific customer’s impaired ability to meet its financial obligation to us, such as in the case of bankruptcy filings or deterioration of financial position.

 

Uncollectible amounts are charged off against trade receivables and the allowance for doubtful accounts when we make a final determination there is no reasonable expectation of recovery. Estimates are used in determining our allowances for all other customers based on factors such as current trends, the length of time the receivables are past due and historical collection experience. While we believe that our allowance for doubtful accounts receivable is adequate and that the judgment applied is appropriate, such estimated amounts could differ materially from what will actually be uncollectible in the future.

 

The retained in-house leases discussed above are considered financing receivables. Our credit policies and evaluation of credit risk and write-off policies are applied alike to trade receivables and the net-investment in sales-type leases. For both, an account is generally past due after thirty days. The financing receivables also have customer-specific reserves for accounts identified for specific impairment, and a non-specific reserve applied to the remaining population, based on factors such as current trends, the length of time the receivables are past due and historical collection experience. The retained in-house leases are not stratified by portfolio or class. Financing receivables which are reserved are generally transferred to cash-basis accounting, so that revenue is recognized only as cash is received. However, the cash basis accounts continue to accrue interest.

 

Sales of accounts receivable.      We offer our customers multi-year, non-cancelable payment terms. Generally we sell non-U.S. government receivables to third-party leasing companies on a non-recourse basis. We reflect the financing costs on the sale of these receivables as a component of our revenue. We record the sale of our accounts receivables as “true sales” in accordance with

 

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accounting guidance for transfers and servicing of financial assets. During the three months ended March 31, 2011 and 2010, we transferred non-recourse accounts receivable totaling $11.0 million and $17.5 million, respectively, which approximated fair value, to third party leasing companies.  At March 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010, accounts receivable included $0.3 million and $0.3 million, respectively, due from third-party leasing companies for transferred non-recourse accounts receivable.

 

Concentration in revenues and in accounts receivable.  There were no customers accounting for 10% or more of revenues in the three months ended March 31, 2011 and March 31, 2010.  There were no customers accounting for 10% or more of accounts receivable at March 31, 2011 and at December 31, 2010.

 

Accounting policy for shipping costs. Outbound freight billed to customers is recorded as product revenue. The related shipping and handling cost is expensed as part of selling, general and administrative expense. Such shipping and handling expenses totaled $0.6 million and $0.5 million for the three months ended March 31, 2011 and 2010, respectively.

 

Dependence on suppliers.  We have a significant supply agreement with a supplier for construction and supply of several sub-assemblies and inventory management of sub-assemblies used in our hardware products.  There are no minimum purchase requirements. The contract may be terminated by either the supplier or by us without cause and at any time upon delivery of two months’ notice.  Purchases from this supplier for the three months ended March 31, 2011 were approximately $5.7 million. Purchases from this supplier for the three months ended March 31, 2010 were approximately $5.3 million.

 

Income Taxes . We record a tax provision for the anticipated tax consequences of our reported results of operations. In accordance with GAAP, the provision for income taxes is computed using the asset and liability method, under which deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the expected future tax consequences of temporary differences between the financial reporting and tax bases of assets and liabilities, and for operating losses and tax credit carry forwards. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using the enacted tax rates expected to apply to taxable income in the periods in which those tax assets and liabilities are expected to be realized or settled. In the event that we determine all or part of the net deferred tax assets are not realizable in the future, we will record a valuation allowance that would be charged to earnings in the period such determination is made.

 

In accordance with ASC 740, we recognize the tax benefit from an uncertain tax position if it is more likely than not that the tax position will be sustained on examination by the taxing authorities, based on the technical merits of the position. The tax benefits recognized in the financial statements from such positions are then measured based on the largest benefit that has a greater than 50% likelihood of being realized upon ultimate settlement. The calculation of tax liabilities involves significant judgment in estimating the impact of uncertainties in the application of GAAP and complex tax laws. Resolution of these uncertainties in a manner inconsistent with management’s expectations could have a material impact on our financial condition and operating results.

 

Total comprehensive income (loss).  Total comprehensive income (loss) was the same as net income for the three months ended March 31, 2011 and 2010.

 

Segment Information.  We manage our business on the basis of one reportable segment. Our products and technologies share similar distribution channels and customers and are sold primarily to hospitals and healthcare facilities to improve patient safety and care and enhance operational efficiency. Our single operating segment is medication and supply dispensing systems. Substantially all of our long-lived assets are located in the United States. For the three months ended March 31, 2011 and 2010, our revenues and gross profits were generated entirely from medication and supply dispensing systems.

 

Recently Issued Accounting Pronouncements.

 

In October 2009, the FASB issued Accounting Standards Updates 2009-13 and 2009-14, which amended ASC 605, “Revenue Recognition,” and ASC 985, “Software,” respectively. Both these updates were adopted by us, prospectively, for the fiscal year beginning January 1, 2011, as described in the revenue recognition policy above.

 

In July 2010, the FASB issued “Disclosure about the Credit Quality of Financing Receivables and the Allowance for Credit Losses” as ASU 2010-20, amending ASC 310, “Receivables.” ASU 2010-20 requires certain disclosures about the credit quality of financing receivables and the related allowance for credit losses. In addition, disclosures are required related to the nature of credit risk inherent in the portfolio of financing receivables, how the credit risk is analyzed and assessed in arriving at the allowance for credit losses, and the changes and reasons for those changes in the allowance for credit losses. The period end disclosures were effective for us for December 31, 2010, and the period-activity disclosures were effective beginning with the first quarter of 2011.  As ASU 2010-20 is a disclosure standard, the adoption of this standard did not have any impact on our operating results, financial position or cash flows.

 

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Note 2. Acquisition

 

On September 29, 2010, we completed the acquisition of all of the outstanding capital stock of Pandora, a provider of analytical software for medication diversion detection and regulatory compliance, for $6.0 million in cash. Pandora solutions are installed in over 700 acute care hospitals in the United States and interface with all major medication management systems in the market.

 

In connection with the acquisition, we recorded $3.6 million of goodwill, equal to the excess of the purchase price over the fair values of the net tangible and intangible assets acquired, which is tax-deductible over a fifteen-year period. The following table summarizes the fair value acquisition accounting for Pandora on the September 29, 2010 purchase date (in thousands):

 

 

 

Fair Values

 

 

 

Acquired

 

 

 

 

 

Cash

 

$

297

 

Accounts receivable

 

416

 

Indemnification asset (see Note 18)

 

1,000

 

Intangibles

 

2,420

 

Goodwill

 

3,561

 

Deferred tax asset

 

108

 

Total assets

 

7,802

 

 

 

 

 

Accrued compensation/other

 

292

 

Deferred service revenue

 

510

 

Litigation contingency (see Note 18)

 

1,000

 

Total liabilities

 

1,802

 

 

 

 

 

Net assets acquired

 

$

6,000

 

 

 

 

 

Cash consideration

 

$

6,000

 

 

The $0.4 million fair value of accounts receivable consists of gross contractual commitments from customers less the amount not expected to be collected. The $0.5 million of deferred service revenue represents the fair value, using estimated discounted cash flows, of acquired remaining performance obligations under service contracts.

 

Additionally, an acquired legal contingency related to a contractual dispute between Pandora and a third party resulted in a liability accrual of $1.0 million, measured under ASC 450 Contingencies guidance.  An indemnification asset of $1.0 million was also recorded, since the former shareholders of Pandora had agreed to indemnify Omnicell against losses related to the litigation and a portion of the purchase price was placed in escrow to secure the indemnification obligations of the former Pandora shareholders.

 

This lawsuit was settled February 17, 2011 for $1.2 million, the settlement amount of which was paid entirely from the selling shareholders’ escrow account. As this is considered a new development, rather than evidence of conditions existing at the September 29, 2010 acquisition date, the disclosure of this dispute in the original purchase price allocation was not adjusted. However, as a recognized subsequent event, on our balance sheet as of December 31, 2010 we recorded the updated $1.2 million values for the acquired legal contingency and the indemnification asset. Furthermore, during the three months ended March 31, 2011, the $1.2 million asset and $1.2 million liability were reversed after settlement from the sellers’ escrow account. There was no impact on net income for either 2010 or 2011.

 

The fair values and useful lives for the identified intangible assets in the table below were determined by management, with assistance of valuation specialists. No residual values were assumed for the acquired intangible assets.

 

 

 

Fair Value (in thousands)

 

Useful Life (years)

 

Trade name

 

$

90

 

3

 

 

Customer relationships

 

1,290

 

16

 

 

Non-compete agreements

 

60

 

3

 

 

Acquired technology

 

980

 

7

 

 

Finite-lived intangibles acquired

 

$

2,420

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weighted average life of intangibles

 

 

 

11.5

 

 

 

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Operating results of Pandora have been combined with our operating results from the date of acquisition. Pro forma combined operating results for Omnicell and Pandora for the years ended December 31, 2010 and 2009 have been omitted since the results of operations of Pandora were not material.

 

Note 3.  Net Income Per Share

 

Basic net income per share is computed by dividing net income for the period by the weighted average number of shares outstanding during the period, less shares subject to repurchase. Diluted net income per share is computed by dividing net income  for the period by the weighted average number of shares less shares subject to repurchase plus, if dilutive, potential common stock outstanding during the period. Potential common stock includes the effect of outstanding dilutive stock options, restricted stock awards and restricted stock units computed using the treasury stock method. Since their impact is anti-dilutive, the total number of shares excluded from the calculations of diluted net income (loss) per share for the three months ended March 31, 2011 and 2010 were 2,033,842 and 1,847,913, respectively.

 

The calculation of basic and diluted net income (loss) per share is as follows (in thousands, except per share amounts):

 

 

 

Three Months Ended
March 31,

 

 

 

2011

 

2010

 

Basic:

 

 

 

 

 

Net income

 

$

670

 

$

979

 

Weighted average shares outstanding — basic

 

33,184

 

32,207

 

Net income per share — basic

 

$

0.02

 

$

0.03

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Diluted:

 

 

 

 

 

Net income

 

$

670

 

$

979

 

Weighted average shares outstanding — basic

 

33,184

 

32,207

 

Add: Dilutive effect of employee stock plans

 

914

 

946

 

Weighted average shares outstanding - diluted

 

34,098

 

33,153

 

Net income per share — diluted

 

$

0.02

 

$

0.03

 

 

Note 4. Cash and Cash Equivalents, Short-term Investments and Fair Value of Financial Instruments

 

Cash and cash equivalents and short-term investments consist of the following significant investment asset classes, with disclosure of amortized cost, gross unrealized gains and losses, and fair value as of March 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010 (in thousands):

 

 

 

March 31, 2011

 

 

 

 

 

Amortized Cost

 

Unrealized
Gains

 

Unrealized
Losses

 

Fair Value

 

Cash / cash
equivalents

 

Short-term
investments

 

Security
classification (1)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash

 

$

11,070

 

 

 

$

11,070

 

$

11,070

 

 

N/A

 

Money market funds

 

162,599

 

 

 

162,599

 

162,599

 

 

Available for sale

 

Non-U.S. government securities

 

8,109

 

$

23

 

 

8,132

 

 

$

8,109

 

Held-to-maturity

 

Total cash, cash equivalents and short-term investments

 

$

181,788

 

$

23

 

 

$

181,811

 

$

173,669

 

$

8,109

 

 

 

 

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Table of Contents

 

 

 

December 31, 2010

 

 

 

 

 

Amortized Cost

 

Unrealized
Gains

 

Unrealized
Losses

 

Fair Value

 

Cash / cash
equivalents

 

Short-term
investments

 

Security
classification (1)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash

 

$

25,593

 

 

 

$

25,593

 

$

25,593

 

 

N/A

 

Money market funds

 

150,042

 

 

 

150,042

 

150,042

 

 

Available for sale

 

Non-U.S. government securities

 

8,074

 

$

12

 

 

8,086

 

 

$

8,074

 

Held-to-maturity

 

Total cash, cash equivalents and short-term investments

 

$

183,709

 

$

12

 

 

$

183,721

 

$

175,635

 

$

8,074

 

 

 

 


(1)            For available-for-sale securities, fair value is the asset’s carrying value, equal to the amortized cost plus any unrealized gains/losses. For held-to-maturity securities, the amortized cost is the asset’s carrying value (since there are no other than temporary impairments) and the fair value gains/losses are not only unrealized, but also unrecorded.

 

The money market fund is a daily-traded cash equivalent with price of $1.00, making it a Level 1 asset class; its carrying cost closely approximates fair value. As the demand deposit (cash) balances vary with the timing of collections and payments, the money market fund can cover any surplus or deficit, and thus is considered available-for-sale.

 

The short term investments purchased in November 2010 are comprised of California revenue anticipation notes, which mature in June 2011. They are recorded at their carrying cost as held-to-maturity as we have both the ability and intent to keep these investments until they mature. The notes are a Level 2 asset class, because their pricing is drawn from multiple market-related inputs, but in general not from same-day, same-security trades.

 

The following table displays the financial assets measured at fair value, on a recurring basis, recorded within cash and cash equivalents (in thousands):

 

 

 

Quoted Prices in Active
Markets for Identical
Instruments

(Level 1)

 

Significant Other
Observable Inputs
(Level 2)

 

Significant
Unobservable
Inputs
(Level 3)

 

Total Fair
Value

 

At March 31, 2011

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Money market funds

 

$

162,599

 

 

 

$

162,599

 

Total

 

$

162,599

 

 

 

$

162,599

 

At December 31, 2010

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Money market funds

 

$

150,042

 

 

 

$

150,042

 

Total

 

$

150,042

 

 

 

$

150,042

 

 

Current assets and current liabilities are recorded at amortized cost, which approximates fair value due to the short maturities implied.

 

The following table displays the financial assets measured at carrying cost, recorded in Short-term investments, for which disclosure of fair value is required on a recurring basis (in thousands):

 

 

 

Quoted Prices in Active
Markets for Identical
Instruments

(Level 1)

 

Significant Other
Observable Inputs
(Level 2)

 

Significant
Unobservable
Inputs

(Level 3)

 

Total Fair
Value

 

At March 31, 2011

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Non-U.S. Government securities

 

 

$

8,132

 

 

$

8,132

 

Total

 

 

$

8,132

 

 

$

8,132

 

At December 31, 2010

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Non-U.S. Government securities

 

 

$

8,086

 

 

$

8,086

 

Total

 

 

$

8,086

 

 

$

8,086

 

 

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Note 5. Inventories

 

Inventories consist of the following (in thousands):

 

 

 

March 31,

 

December 31,

 

 

 

2011

 

2010

 

Raw materials

 

$

8,005

 

$

4,252

 

Work in process

 

184

 

153

 

Finished goods

 

7,210

 

5,380

 

Total

 

$

15,399

 

$

9,785

 

 

Note 6. Property and Equipment

 

Property and equipment consist of the following (in thousands):

 

 

 

March 31,

 

December 31,

 

 

 

2011

 

2010

 

Equipment

 

$

21,125

 

$

20,045

 

Furniture and fixtures

 

1,800

 

1,681

 

Leasehold improvements

 

3,659

 

3,182

 

Purchased software

 

18,580

 

18,095

 

Capital in process

 

2,050

 

1,689

 

 

 

47,214

 

44,692

 

Accumulated depreciation and amortization

 

(31,871

)

(30,341

)

Property and equipment, net

 

$

15,343

 

$

14,351

 

 

Depreciation and amortization of property and equipment was approximately $1.4 million for both the three months ended March 31, 2011 and 2010.

 

Note 7. Net Investment in Sales-Type Leases

 

Our sales-type leases are for terms generally ranging up to five years. Sales-type lease receivables are collateralized by the underlying equipment. The components of our net investment in sales-type leases are as follows (in thousands):

 

 

 

March 31,

 

December 31,

 

 

 

2011

 

2010

 

Net minimum lease payments to be received

 

$

16,244

 

$

16,284

 

Less unearned interest income portion

 

1,841

 

1,843

 

Net investment in sales-type leases

 

14,403

 

14,441

 

Less current portion(1)

 

5,152

 

5,217

 

Non-current net investment in sales-type leases(2)

 

$

9,251

 

$

9,224

 

 

The minimum lease payments under sales-type leases as of March 31, 2011 are as follows (in thousands):

 

2011 (remaining nine months)

 

$

4,801

 

2012

 

5,029

 

2013

 

3,140

 

2014

 

2,044

 

2015

 

1,080

 

Thereafter

 

150

 

Total

 

$

16,244

 

 


(1)   A component of other current assets. This amount is net of allowance for doubtful accounts of $0.2 million as of March 31, 2011 and $0.1 million as of December 31, 2010.

 

(2)   Net of allowance for doubtful accounts of $0.2 million as of March 31, 2011 and $0.3 million as of December 31, 2010.

 

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The following table summarizes the credit losses and recorded investment in sales-type leases, excluding unearned interest, as of March 31, 2010 and December 31, 2010 (in thousands):

 

 

 

Allowance for credit losses

 

Recorded investment
in sales-type leases-
Gross

 

Recorded investment
in sales-type leases -
Net

 

Credit loss disclosure for March 31, 2011:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accounts individually evaluated for impairment

 

$

256

 

$

256

 

$

 

Accounts collectively evaluated for impairment

 

124

 

14,527

 

14,403

 

Ending balances: March 31, 2011

 

$

380

 

$

14,783

 

$

14,403

 

Credit loss disclosure for December 31, 2010:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accounts individually evaluated for impairment

 

$

283

 

$

283

 

$

 

Accounts collectively evaluated for impairment

 

128

 

14,569

 

14,441

 

Ending balances: December 31, 2010

 

$

411

 

$

14,852

 

$

14,441

 

 

The following table summarizes the activity for the allowance for credit losses account for the investment in sales-type leases for the three months ended March 31, 2011 (in thousands):

 

 

 

Three Months Ended
March 31, 2011

 

Allowance for credit losses at December 31, 2010

 

$

411

 

Current period recovery

 

(4

)

Direct write-downs charged against the allowance

 

 

Recoveries of amounts previously charged off

 

(27

)

Allowance for credit losses at March 31, 2011

 

$

380

 

 

Note 8. Goodwill and Other Intangible Assets

 

Under ASC 350, “Intangibles — Goodwill and Other,” goodwill and intangible assets with an indefinite life are not subject to amortization.  Rather, we evaluate these assets for impairment at least annually or more frequently if events or changes in circumstances suggest that the carrying amount may not be recoverable.

 

Goodwill and other intangible assets consist of the following (in thousands):

 

 

 

March 31, 2011

 

December 31, 2010

 

 

 

 

 

Gross

 

 

 

Net

 

Gross

 

 

 

Net

 

 

 

 

 

Carrying

 

Accumulated

 

Carrying

 

Carrying

 

Accumulated

 

Carrying

 

Amortization

 

 

 

Amount

 

Amortization

 

Amount

 

Amount

 

Amortization

 

Amount

 

Life

 

Finite-lived intangibles:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Customer relationships

 

$

4,230

 

$

1,254

 

$

2,976

 

$

4,230

 

$

1,142

 

$

3,088

 

5-16 years

 

Acquired technology

 

5,660

 

4,750

 

910

 

5,660

 

4,715

 

945

 

3-7 years

 

Patents

 

678

 

156

 

522

 

654

 

152

 

502

 

20 years

 

Non-compete agreements

 

780

 

730

 

50

 

780

 

725

 

55

 

3 years

 

Trade name

 

90

 

15

 

75

 

90

 

8

 

82

 

3 years

 

Total finite-lived intangibles

 

11,438

 

6,905

 

4,533

 

11,414

 

6,742

 

4,672

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Goodwill

 

28,543

 

 

28,543

 

28,543

 

 

28,543

 

Indefinite

 

Net other intangibles and goodwill

 

$

39,981

 

$

6,905

 

$

33,076

 

$

39,957

 

$

6,742

 

$

33,215

 

 

 

 

Amortization expense totaled $0.2 million and $0.6 million for the three months ended March 31, 2011 and 2010, respectively. Estimated annual expected amortization expense of the finite-lived intangible assets at March 31, 2011 is as follows (in thousands):

 

2011 (remaining nine months)

 

$

490

 

2012

 

653

 

2013

 

641

 

2014

 

601

 

2015

 

578

 

Thereafter

 

1,570

 

Total

 

$

4,533

 

 

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Table of Contents

 

Note 9. Accrued Liabilities

 

Accrued liabilities consist of the following (in thousands):

 

 

 

March 31,

 

December 31,

 

 

 

2011

 

2010

 

Accrued Group Purchasing Organization (GPO) fees

 

$

2,137

 

$

2,272

 

Advance payments from customers

 

1,836

 

1,978

 

Rebates and lease buyouts

 

1,318

 

1,923

 

Litigation settlement

 

1,000

 

 

Pre-acquisition contingency

 

 

1,200

 

Other

 

2,443

 

1,311

 

Total

 

$

8,734

 

$

8,684

 

 

Note 10. Deferred Gross Profit

 

Deferred gross profit consists of the following (in thousands):

 

 

 

March 31,

 

December 31,

 

 

 

2011

 

2010

 

Sales of medication and supply dispensing systems, which have been delivered and invoiced but not yet installed

 

$

18,478

 

$

18,739

 

Cost of revenues, excluding installation costs

 

(7,469

)

(7,020

)

Deferred gross profit

 

$

11,009

 

$

11,719

 

 

Note 11. Commitments

 

The minimum payments under our operating leases for each of the five succeeding fiscal years are as follows (in thousands):

 

2011 (remaining nine months)

 

$

2,959

 

2012

 

1,832

 

2013

 

545

 

2014

 

351

 

2015

 

178

 

Total

 

$

5,865

 

 

Commitments under operating leases relate primarily to leasehold property and office equipment. For the remaining nine months of 2011, we have $0.3 million of non-cancellable sublease income

 

We purchase components from a variety of suppliers and use contract manufacturers to provide manufacturing services for our products. During the normal course of business, we issue purchase orders with estimates of our requirements several months ahead of the delivery dates. Our near-term commitments to our contract manufacturers and suppliers totaled $5.8 million as of March 31, 2011.

 

Note 12. Contingencies

 

Legal Proceedings

 

Medacist Solutions Group, LLC .  On July 8, 2009, Medacist Solutions Group LLC filed a complaint against Omnicell in U.S. District Court in the Southern District of New York, entitled Medacist Solutions Group LLC v. Omnicell, Inc., case number 09 CV 6128, alleging infringement of Medacist’s U.S. Patent Number 6,842,736. The complaint also, among other claims, alleges that

 

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Omnicell breached the terms of a nondisclosure agreement it had entered into with Medacist, and that Omnicell misappropriated Medacist’s trade secrets and confidential information in violation of the NDA. Medacist is seeking unspecified monetary damages and an injunction against the Company’s infringement of the specified patent and/or misuse of any of Medacist’s trade secrets pursuant to the NDA or in violation of California code. Omnicell has responded to the complaint, denies the claims, and intends to defend the matter vigorously.

 

On October 20, 2010, the Company filed a declaratory judgment complaint against Medacist Solutions Group, LLC in the U.S. District Court in the Northern District of California, entitled Omnicell, Inc. and Pandora Data Systems, Inc. v. Medacist Solutions Group, LLC, Case Number 10-cv-4746 (the “California Action”).  Pandora Data Systems, Inc. had entered into a Settlement and License Agreement with Medacist in October 2008 (the “Settlement Agreement”) pursuant to which, among other things, Medacist granted to Pandora a non-exclusive license to Medacist’s U.S. Patent Number 6,842,736.  The Company seeks an order declaring that Omnicell, as now-owner of Pandora Data Systems, Inc., is entitled to certain rights and benefits under the license.  On November 12, 2010, Medacist filed a motion to dismiss the California Action, or in the alternative, to transfer venue to the U.S. District Court for the District of Connecticut.  On February 10, 2011, the Court granted Medacist’s motion and dismissed the California Action without prejudice.  On February 14, 2011, Omnicell and Pandora filed a notice of appeal regarding dismissal of the California Action with the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit (the “California Appeal”).  The California Appeal is now pending.  Also on November 12, 2010, Medacist filed a motion in the U.S. District Court in the District of Connecticut to reopen a litigation entitled Medacist Solutions Group, LLC v. Pandora Data Systems, Inc., Case Number 3:07-CV-00692(JCH) (the “Connecticut Litigation”), which had been dismissed and administratively closed since October 29, 2008.  Medacist seeks, among other things, relief from the Stipulation of Dismissal entered on October 29, 2008 dismissing the Connecticut Litigation for the limited purpose of interpreting and enforcing the Settlement Agreement, the entry of a temporary restraining order and preliminary and permanent injunctions prohibiting breaches of the Settlement Agreement, a finding that Pandora breached the Settlement Agreement and an award of monetary damages resulting from Pandora’s alleged breaches.  On December 3, 2010, the Company and Pandora filed a response to this motion.  At this time, the Connecticut Litigation remains closed, and no hearings have been scheduled on Medacist’s motion.

 

As of March 31, 2011, we reached a tentative settlement agreement with Medacist, pursuant to which we agreed to pay Medacist $1.0 million in exchange for a fully-paid, perpetual license to Medacist’s patented technology and the parties agreed to dismiss all pending lawsuits and fully release each other from all claims.  In addition, we agreed that a license transfer fee payment of  $0.5 million would be made to Medacist in the event certain change-in-control conditions are met. While the tentative agreement substantiates that the contingent loss is both probable and estimable for accrual in the first quarter of 2011, the final settlement would be effective only after all terms are negotiated and executed in formal documents, which has yet to occur. The $1.0 million contingent loss for this settlement was recorded within selling, general and administrative expenses during the three months ended March 31, 2011.

 

As required under ASC 450, “Contingencies,” we accrue for contingencies when we believe that a loss is probable and that we can reasonably estimate the amount of any such loss. We have made an assessment of the probability of incurring any such losses and such amounts are reflected in accrued liabilities in our consolidated financial statements. Except as otherwise indicated above, we believe that the outcomes in these matters are not probable or reasonably estimable. We believe that we have valid defenses with respect to legal matters pending against us. However, litigation is inherently unpredictable, and it is possible that cash flows or results of operations could be materially affected in any particular period by the unfavorable resolution of one or more of these contingencies or because of the diversion of management’s attention and the creation of significant expenses

 

Note 13. Stockholders’ Equity

 

Treasury Stock

 

During 2008, our Board of Directors authorized stock repurchase programs for the repurchase of up to $90.0 million of our common stock. All repurchased shares were recorded as treasury stock and were accounted for under the cost method. No repurchased shares have been retired. The timing, price and volume of the repurchases have been based on market conditions, relevant securities laws and other factors. The stock repurchase program does not obligate us to repurchase any specific number of shares, and we may terminate or suspend the repurchase program at any time. From the inception of the program in February 2008 through March 31, 2011, we repurchased a total of 4,407,396 shares at an average cost of $15.84 per share through open market purchases.

 

During the three months ended March 31, 2011 we repurchased 341,100 shares through the 2008 stock repurchase program but repurchased none in the three months ended March 31, 2010.  As of March 31, 2011 we had $20.2 million of remaining authorized funds to repurchase additional shares under the stock repurchase programs.

 

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Table of Contents

 

Note 14. Stock Option Plans and Share-Based Compensation

 

Stock Option Plans

 

At March 31, 2011, a total of 3,007,477 shares of common stock was reserved for future issuance under our 2009 Equity Incentive Plan (the “2009 Plan”).  At March 31, 2011, $7.6 million of total unrecognized compensation cost related to non-vested stock options is expected to be recognized over a weighted average period of 2.7 years.

 

A summary of aggregate option activity for the three months ended March 31, 2011 is presented below:

 

Options:

 

Number of Shares

 

Weighted-
Average
Exercise Price

 

 

 

(in thousands)

 

 

 

Outstanding at December 31, 2010

 

4,740

 

$

12.86

 

Granted

 

199

 

$

14.10

 

Exercised

 

(117

)

$

7.42

 

Forfeited

 

(21

)

$

13.05

 

Expired

 

(6

)

$

21.00

 

Outstanding at March 31, 2011

 

4,795

 

$

13.04

 

Exercisable at March 31, 2011

 

3,558

 

$

13.16

 

 

Restricted Stock, and Time-based Restricted Stock Units

 

The non-employee members of our Board of Directors are granted restricted stock on the day of our annual meeting of stockholders and such shares of restricted stock vest on the date of the subsequent year’s annual meeting of stockholders, provided such non-employee director remains a director on such date.  Restricted stock units (“RSUs”) are granted to certain of our employees and generally vest over a period of four years and are expensed ratably on a straight-line basis over the vesting period.  The fair value of both restricted stock and RSUs granted pursuant to our stock option plans is the product of the number of shares granted and the grant date fair value of our common stock.  Our unrecognized compensation cost related to non-vested restricted stock at March 31, 2011 was approximately $0.1 million and is expected to be recognized over a weighted average period of 0.2 years. Expected future compensation expense relating to RSUs outstanding on March 31, 2011 is $4.3 million over a weighted-average period of 2.7 years.

 

A summary of activity of both restricted stock and RSUs for the three months ended March 31, 2011 is presented below:

 

 

 

Restricted Stock

 

Restricted Stock Units

 

 

 

 

 

Weighted -

 

 

 

Weighted -

 

 

 

 

 

Average

 

 

 

Average

 

 

 

 

 

Grant Date

 

 

 

Grant Date

 

 

 

Number of

 

Fair Value Per

 

Number of

 

Fair Value Per

 

 

 

Shares

 

Share

 

Shares

 

Share

 

 

 

(in thousands)

 

 

 

(in thousands)

 

 

 

Non-vested, December 31, 2010

 

77

 

$

12.91

 

308

 

$

12.98

 

Granted

 

 

 

 

56

 

$

14.08

 

Vested

 

 

 

 

(15

)

$

16.37

 

Forfeited

 

 

 

 

(2

)

$

12.19

 

Non-vested, March 31, 2011

 

77

 

$

12.91

 

347

 

$

13.02

 

 

Performance-based Restricted Stock Units

 

Additionally, beginning in 2011 we are incorporating performance-based restricted stock units (“PSUs”) as an element of our executive compensation plans. For the executive officers, the 2011 grants totaled 100,000 stock options, 50,000 time-based RSUs and 100,000 PSUs. Our unrecognized compensation cost related to non-vested performance-based restricted stock units at March 31, 2011 was approximately $0.9 million and is expected to be recognized over a weighted average period of 2.0 years.

 

Vesting for the performance-based restricted stock unit awards is based on the percentile placement of our total shareholder return among the companies listed in the NASDAQ Healthcare Index (the “Index”) and time-based vesting.  We calculate total shareholder return based on the one year annualized rates of return reflecting price appreciation plus reinvestment of dividends.  The stock price appreciation is calculated based on the average closing prices of the applicable company’s common stock for the 20 trading days ending on the last trading day of the year prior to the date of grant as compared to the average closing prices for the 20 trading days ended on the last trading day of the year of grant . The following table shows the percent of performance-based restricted stock unit awards eligible for further time-based vesting based on our percentile placement:

 

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Percentile Placement of
Our Total Shareholder
Return

 

% of Performance-Based
RSUs Eligible for Time-
Based Vesting

 

Below the 35th percentile

 

0%

 

At least the 35th percentile, but below the 50th percentile

 

50%

 

At least the 50th percentile, but below the 65th percentile

 

100%

 

At least the 65th percentile, but below the 75th percentile

 

110% to 119%(1)

 

At or above the 75th percentile

 

120%

 

 


(1)           The actual percentage of RSUs eligible for further time-based vesting is based on straight-line interpolation, where, for example, if the ranking is the 70 th  percentile, then the vesting percentage is 115%.

 

After the last trading day of 2011, the Compensation Committee of our Board of Directors will determine the percentile rank of the company’s total shareholder return and the number of performance-based restricted stock unit awards eligible for further time-based vesting.  The eligible performance-based restricted stock unit awards will vest as follows: 25% of the eligible awards will vest immediately with the remaining eligible awards vesting in equal increments, semi-annually, over the subsequent three year period. Vesting is contingent upon continued service. Depending on our market-based performance, the 100,000 PSUs awarded in 2011 could result in actual shares released of none, 50,000, 100,000 or linear interpolation between 110,000 and 120,000 shares, with 120,000 shares as the maximum result for market performance at or above the 75 th  percentile in the industry.

 

The fair value of a PSU award is the average of trial-specific values of the award over each of one million Monte Carlo trials. Each trial-specific value is the market value of the award at the end of the one-year performance period discounted back to the grant date. The market value of the award for each trial at the end of the performance period is the product of (a) the per share value of Omnicell stock at the end of the performance period and (b) the number of shares that vest. The number of shares that vest at the end of the performance period depends on the percentile ranking of the total shareholder return for Omnicell stock over the performance period relative to the total shareholder return of each of the other companies in the Index as shown in the table above.

 

A summary of activity of the PSUs for the three months ended March 31, 2011 is presented below:

 

 

 

 

 

Weighted -

 

 

 

 

 

Average

 

 

 

 

 

Grant Date

 

 

 

 

 

Fair Value Per

 

Performance Stock Units

 

Number of Shares

 

Share

 

 

 

(in thousands)

 

 

 

Non-vested, December 31, 2010

 

 

 

Granted

 

100

 

$

11.15

 

Vested

 

 

 

Forfeited

 

 

 

Non-vested, March 31, 2011

 

100

 

$

11.15

 

 

Employee Stock Purchase Plan

 

We have an Employee Stock Purchase Plan (“ESPP”), under which employees can purchase shares of our common stock based on a percentage of their compensation, but not greater than 15% of their earnings, up to a maximum of $25,000 of fair value per year. The purchase price per share must be equal to the lower of 85% of the fair value of the common stock at the beginning of a 24-month offering period or the end of each six-month purchasing period. As of March 31, 2011, 3,238,233 shares had been issued under the ESPP.  As of March 31, 2011, there were a total of 2,093,322 shares reserved for future issuance under the ESPP.  During the three months ended March 31, 2011, 279,203 shares of common stock were purchased under the ESPP.

 

Share-based Compensation

 

We account for share-based awards granted to employees and directors including employee stock option awards, restricted stock and RSUs issued pursuant to the 2009 Plan and employee stock purchases made under our ESPP using the estimated grant date fair value method of accounting in accordance with ASC 718, “Stock Compensation.”

 

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The impact on our results for share-based compensation for the three months ended March 31, 2011 and 2010 was as follows (in thousands):

 

 

 

Three Months Ended March 31,

 

 

 

2011

 

2010

 

Cost of product and service revenues

 

$

367

 

$

321

 

Research and development expenses

 

327

 

244

 

Selling, general and administrative expenses

 

1,698

 

1,591

 

Total share-based compensation expenses

 

$

2,392

 

$

2,156

 

 

We value options and ESPP shares using the Black-Scholes-Merton option-pricing model. Restricted stock and time-based RSUs are valued at the grant date fair value of the underlying common shares. The PSUs are valued via Monte Carlo simulation, as described above.

 

ITEM 2.                  MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

 

Forward-Looking Statements

 

This Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q contains forward-looking statements. The forward looking statements are contained principally in the sections entitled “Risk Factors” and “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.” These statements involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors which may cause our actual results, performance or achievements to be materially different from any future results, performances or achievements expressed or implied by the forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to, statements about:

 

·                        the extent and timing of future revenues, including the amounts of our current backlog, which represent firm orders that have not completed installation and therefore have not been recognized as revenue;

 

·                        the size and/or growth of our market or market-share;

 

·                        the opportunity presented by new products or emerging markets;

 

·                        our expectations regarding our future backlog levels;

 

·                        the operating margins or earnings per share goals we may set;

 

·                        our ability to align our cost structure and headcount with our current business expectations;

 

·                        our ability to protect our intellectual property and operate our business without infringing upon the intellectual property rights of others;

 

·                        our ability to conduct acquisitions for strategic value, and successfully integrate each one into our operations; and

 

·                        our ability to generate cash from operations and our estimates regarding the sufficiency of our cash resources.

 

In some cases, you can identify forward-looking statements by terms such as “anticipates,” “believes,” “could,” “estimates,” “expects,” “intends,” “may,” “plans,” “potential,” “predicts,” “will,” “would” and similar expressions intended to identify forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements reflect our current views with respect to future events, are based on assumptions, and are subject to risks and uncertainties. We discuss many of these risks in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q in greater detail in Part II — Section 1A. “Risk Factors” below.  Given these uncertainties, you should not place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements. Also, forward-looking statements represent our estimates and assumptions only as of the date of this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q.  You should also read our Annual Report on Form 10-K and the documents that we reference in the Annual Report on Form 10-K and have filed as exhibits, completely and with the understanding that our actual future results may be materially different from what we expect.  All references in this report to “Omnicell, Inc.,” “Omnicell,” “our,” “us,” “we” or the “Company” collectively refer to Omnicell, Inc., a Delaware corporation, and its subsidiaries.

 

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Except as required by law, we assume no obligation to update any forward-looking statements publicly, or to update the reasons actual results could differ materially from those anticipated in any forward-looking statements, even if new information becomes available in the future.

 

Overview

 

We were incorporated in California in 1992 under the name Omnicell Technologies, Inc. and reincorporated in Delaware in 2001 as Omnicell, Inc. We are a leading provider of automated solutions for hospital medication and supply management. Our healthcare automation solutions are designed to enable healthcare facilities to acquire, manage, dispense and administer medications and medical-surgical supplies, and are intended to enhance patient safety, reduce medication errors, improve workflow and increase operational efficiency. When used in combination, our products and services provide healthcare facilities with a comprehensive solution designed to enhance patient safety and improve operational efficiency. Approximately 2,300 hospitals utilize one or more of our products, of which more than 1,600 hospitals in the United States have installed our automated hardware/software solutions for controlling, dispensing, acquiring, verifying and tracking medications and medical and surgical supplies.

 

We sell our medication dispensing and supply automation systems, and generate the substantial majority of our revenue, in the United States.  However, we expect our revenue from our international operations to increase in future periods as we continue to grow our international business.  Our sales force is organized by geographic region in the United States and Canada. We also sell through distributors in Asia, Australia, Europe, and South America.  We have not sold in the past, and have no future plans to sell our products either directly or indirectly to customers located in countries that are identified as state sponsors of terrorism by the U.S. Department of State, and are subject to economic sanctions and export controls.

 

We operate in one business segment, the design, manufacturing, selling and servicing of medication and supply dispensing systems. Our management team evaluates our performance based on company-wide, consolidated results.  In general, we recognize revenue when our medication dispensing and supply automation systems are installed. Installation generally takes place two weeks to twelve months after our systems are ordered. The installation process at our customers’ sites includes internal procedures associated with large capital expenditures and additional time associated with adopting new technologies. Given the length of time necessary for our customers to plan for and complete their acceptance of the installation of our systems, our focus is on shipping products based on the installation dates requested by our customers and working at our customer’s pace. The amount of revenue recognized in future periods may depend on, among other things, the terms and timing of lease contract renewals, additional product sales and the size of such transactions. We believe that future revenue will be affected by the competitiveness of our products and services.

 

Operating Environment During the Three Months Ended March 31, 2011

 

Our revenues have remained stable year-over-year with product revenue flat and service revenue showing steady gains.  Our profitability improved with both product margins and service margins showing gains year over year.  We believe our solutions are attractive relative to our competition.  In particular:

 

·         We have continued to differentiate ourselves through a strategy intended to create the best customer experience in healthcare;

 

·         We have delivered industry-leading products with differentiated product features that are designed to appeal to nurses and pharmacists such as our recently announced G4 platform, the Savvy™ Mobile Medication System, SinglePointe™, Tissue Center System, and Anywhere RN™; and

 

·         The market environment of increased patient safety awareness and increased regulatory control has driven our solutions to be a high priority in customers’ capital budgets.

 

We maintain a development staff with expertise in hospital logistics and computerized automated solutions that allows us to regularly deliver new innovations to the market.  Our ability to grow revenue and maintain positive cash flow is dependent on our ability to continue to receive orders from customers, the volume of installations we are able to complete, our ability to meet customers’ needs and provide a quality installation experience and our flexibility in manpower allocations among customers to complete installations on a timely basis.

 

During the first quarter of 2011, we achieved similar performance in total revenues and net income compared to the fourth quarter of 2010. Product revenue decreased modestly, by $1.0 million, while service revenue increased slightly, by $0.9 million.  Overall gross margins improved by 0.6% to 55.4% with product gross margins improving to 58.1% on revenue of $42.6 million as compared with 57.2% on revenue of $43.5 million in the prior quarter.  The service gross margins were stable, with 47.4% on revenue

 

20



Table of Contents

 

of $14.6 million as compared with 47.1% margins on $13.7 million in revenue in the prior quarter.  The product gross margin increase was driven primarily by product mix and reduction in intangible amortization.

 

We believe that our gross margins will continue to fluctuate based on the mix of products installed and changes in service and installation headcount compared to our revenue level.

 

Cash decreased during the quarter by $2.0 million due to $4.5 million of stock repurchases during the three months ended March 31, 2011, which more than offset the $2.9 million of net cash provided by operating activities.

 

The humanitarian and environmental tragedy unfolding in Japan due to catastrophic earthquakes and tsunamis in March 2011 also has broadly-felt and long-term economic impacts. However, our overall assessment of our business risks and uncertainties has not appreciably changed.  We have no significant investment or customer base in Japan. Our principal Japan-based supplier has advised us there will be no material disruptions in our scheduled deliveries. Please refer to Item 1A risk factors for further discussion regarding catastrophic events.

 

Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates

 

Our discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations are based on our consolidated financial statements, which have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States. The preparation of these financial statements requires us to make certain estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, disclosure of any contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting periods. We regularly review our estimates and assumptions, which are based on historical experience and various other factors that are believed to be reasonable under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying values of certain assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources. Actual results may differ from these estimates and assumptions. We believe that the following critical accounting policies are affected by significant judgments and estimates used in the preparation of our condensed consolidated financial statements:

 

·    Revenue recognition;

·    Provision for allowances;

·    Valuation and impairment of goodwill, other intangible assets and other long lived assets;

·    Inventory;

·    Valuation of share-based awards; and

·    Accounting for income taxes.

 

During the three months ended March 31, 2011, there were no significant changes in our critical accounting policies and estimates, except for the initial adoption of revised revenue recognition guidance for multiple element deliverables, as described below.

 

Revenue recognition. We earn revenues from sales of our medication and supply dispensing systems, with related services, which are sold in our principal market, which is the healthcare industry. Our market is primarily located in the United States. Our customer arrangements typically include one or more of the following deliverables:

 

·       Products — Software enabled equipment that manages and regulates the storage and dispensing of pharmaceuticals and other medical supplies.

·       Software — Additional software applications that enable incremental functionality of our equipment.

·       Installation — Installation of equipment as integrated systems at customers’ sites.

·       Post-installation technical support — Phone support, on-site service, parts and access to unspecified software upgrades and enhancements, if and when available.

·       Professional services — Other customer services such as training and consulting.

 

We recognize revenue when the earnings process is complete, based upon our evaluation of whether the following four criteria have been met:

 

·       Persuasive evidence of an arrangement.   We use signed customer contracts and signed customer purchase orders as evidence of an arrangement for leases and sales. For service engagements, we use a signed services agreement and a statement of work to evidence an arrangement.

 

·       Delivery has occurred.   Equipment and software product delivery is deemed to occur upon successful installation and receipt of a signed and dated customer confirmation of installation letter providing evidence that we have delivered what the customer ordered. In instances of a customer self-installed installation, product delivery is deemed to have occurred

 

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Table of Contents

 

upon receipt of a signed and dated customer confirmation letter. If a sale does not require installation, we recognize revenue on delivery of products to the customer, including transfer of title and risk of loss. We recognize revenue from sales of products to distributors upon delivery since we do not allow for rights of return or refund.

 

We recognize revenue for support services ratably over the related support services contract period. We recognize revenue on training and professional services as they are performed.

 

·       Fee is fixed or determinable.   We assess whether a fee is fixed or determinable at the outset of the arrangement based on the payment terms associated with the transaction. We have established a history of collecting under the original contract without providing concessions on payments, products or services.

 

·       Collection is probable.   We assess the probability of collecting from each customer at the outset of the arrangement based on a number of factors, including the customer’s payment history and its current creditworthiness. If, in our judgment, collection of a fee is not probable, we defer the revenue until the uncertainty is removed, which generally means revenue is recognized upon our receipt of cash payment. Our historical experience has been that collection from our customers is generally probable.

 

In arrangements with multiple deliverables , we recognize revenue for individual delivered items if they have value to the customer on a standalone basis. Effective for new or modified arrangements entered into beginning on January 1, 2011, the date we adopted the new revenue recognition guidance for arrangements with multiple deliverables on a prospective basis, we allocate arrangement consideration at the inception of the arrangement to all deliverables using the relative selling price method. This method requires us to determine the selling price at which each deliverable could be sold if it were sold regularly on a standalone basis. When available, we use vendor-specific objective evidence (“VSOE”) of fair value as the selling price. VSOE represents the price charged for a deliverable when it is sold separately or for a deliverable not yet being sold separately, the price established by management with the relevant authority. We consider VSOE to exist when approximately 80% or more of our standalone sales of an item are priced within a reasonably narrow pricing range (plus or minus 15% of the median rates). We have established VSOE of fair value for our post-installation technical support services and professional services. When VSOE of fair value is not available, third-party evidence (“TPE”) of fair value for similar products and services is acceptable; however, our offerings and market strategy differ from those of our competitors, such that we cannot obtain sufficient comparable information about third parties’ prices. If neither VSOE nor TPE are available, we use our best estimates of selling prices (“BESP”). We determine BESP considering factors such as market conditions, sales channels, internal costs and product margin objectives, and pricing practices. We regularly review and update our VSOE, TPE and BESP information and obtain formal approval by appropriate levels of management.

 

The relative selling price method allocates total arrangement consideration proportionally to each deliverable on the basis of its estimated selling price. In addition, the amount recognized for any delivered items cannot exceed that which is not contingent upon delivery of any remaining items in the arrangement.

 

We also use the residual method of allocating the arrangement consideration in certain circumstances. Under the residual method, the amount allocated to the undelivered elements equals VSOE of fair value of these elements. Any remaining amounts are attributed to the delivered items and are recognized when those items are delivered. We use the residual method to allocate total arrangement consideration between delivered and undelivered items for any arrangements entered into prior to January 1, 2011, and not subsequently materially-modified, as the use of the residual method is required by software revenue recognition rules that applied to sales of most of our products and services until the adoption of the new revenue recognition guidance. We also use the residual method to allocate revenue between the software products that enable incremental equipment functionality and thus are not deemed to deliver its essential functionality, and the related post-installation technical support, as these products and services continue to be accounted for under software revenue recognition rules.

 

The adoption of the new revenue recognition guidance did not result in changes in what we identify as the individual deliverables to which revenue is allocated, or the timing of revenue recognition related to these individual deliverables. The change in the allocation method from residual to relative selling price did not have a material impact on our financial statements during the three months ended March 31, 2011.  In addition, there is a time lag between when we receive a signed customer purchase order or contract and when we install the products, sometimes as long as one year or more, primarily due to the installation cycles and timing preferences of our customers. In the future periods, we anticipate the cumulative impact of the adoption may increase, as additional arrangements become subject to the new revenue recognition guidance. However, the specific adjustments for any future quarter are not predictable, as they depend on the timing of our backlog shipments and installations and the nature of the orders we receive from new customers.

 

A portion of our sales are made through multi-year lease agreements. We recognize product related revenue under sales-type leases, net of lease execution costs such as post-installation product maintenance and technical support, at the net present value of the lease payment stream once our installation obligations have been met. We optimize cash flows by selling a majority of our non-U.S.

 

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Table of Contents

 

government leases to third-party leasing finance companies on a non-recourse basis. We have no obligation to the leasing company once the lease has been sold. Some of our sales-type leases, mostly those relating to U.S. government hospitals, are retained in-house. Interest income in these leases is recognized in product revenue using the interest method.

 

Please refer to Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations contained in Part II, Item 7 of our Annual Report on Form 10-K for our fiscal year ended December 31, 2010 for a more complete discussion of our critical accounting policies and estimates.

 

Material Weakness in Internal Control Over Financial Reporting

 

Based on our management evaluation of disclosure controls and procedures as of March 31, 2011, our chief executive officer and chief financial officer have concluded that our disclosure controls and procedures as of March 31, 2011 were not effective at the reasonable assurance level.  Since our remediation efforts are not yet completed, we remain subject to the material weakness described below and identified by the similar evaluation conducted at December 31, 2010 and set forth in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2010.

 

As of December 31, 2010, our management had concluded that our internal control over financial reporting was not effective in providing reasonable assurance that a material misstatement of our interim or annual financial statements would be prevented or detected on a timely basis. That 2010 evaluation concluded that we have a material weakness related to accounting for income taxes. Specifically, our processes, procedures and controls related to the preparation and review of the annual tax provision were not effective to ensure that amounts recorded for the tax provision and the related current and deferred income tax asset and liability accounts were accurate and determined in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles. Additionally, we did not maintain effective controls over the review and analysis of supporting work papers for such tax balances.

 

Our management has committed to the following corrective actions for the current fiscal year:

 

·       Re-assessing the relationship with our third party consultant to ensure that there is an adequate level of review of the tax provision performed by the consultant and an appropriate level of oversight and validation by our management;

 

·       Ensuring the internal review processes are carefully executed and monitored to properly account for changes to the underlying supporting documentation; and

 

·       Implementing and utilizing income tax software to ensure a comprehensive reconciliation of all balance sheet tax accounts to our financial reporting system.

 

During the three months ended March 31, 2011, we took the following remediation steps:

 

·       We signed an engagement letter with our third party tax consultant enhancing the tax provision review process.   These enhancements have included the tax consultant’s detailed review of the income tax provision, regular discussions with our management, and consultation, as necessary with our independent registered public accounting form.

 

·       We commenced a search for a Senior Tax Manager.

 

·       We continue the implementation of certain tax software packages.

 

Notwithstanding the above-mentioned material weakness, we believe that the consolidated financial statements included in this report fairly represent our consolidated financial position as of March 31, 2011, and consolidated results of operations and cash flows for the three months ended March 31, 2011 and 2010.

 

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

 

In October 2009, the FASB issued Accounting Standards Updates 2009-13 and 2009-14 which amended ASC 605, “Revenue Recognition,” and ASC 985, “Software,” respectively. Both these updates were adopted by us, prospectively, for the fiscal year beginning January 1, 2011, as described in the revenue recognition policy above.

 

In July 2010, the FASB issued “Disclosure about the Credit Quality of Financing Receivables and the Allowance for Credit Losses” as ASU 2010-20, amending ASC 310, “Receivables.” ASU 2010-20 requires certain disclosures about the credit quality of financing receivables and the related allowance for credit losses. In addition, disclosures are required related to the nature of credit risk inherent in the portfolio of financing receivables, how the credit risk is analyzed and assessed in arriving at the allowance for credit losses, and the changes and reasons for those changes in the allowance for credit losses. The period end disclosures were effective for us for December 31, 2010, and the period-activity disclosures were effective beginning with the first quarter of 2011.  As ASU 2010-20 is a disclosure standard, the adoption of this standard did not have any impact on our operating results, financial position or cash flows.

 

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Table of Contents

 

Results of Operations

 

The table below shows the components of our results of operations as percentages of total revenues for the three months ended March 31, 2011 and 2010:

 

 

 

Three Months Ended March 31,

 

 

 

2011

 

% of Revenue

 

2010

 

% of Revenue

 

 

 

(in thousands, except for percentages)

 

Revenues:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Product revenues

 

$

42,575

 

74.5

%

$

42,295

 

78.1

%

Services and other revenues

 

14,585

 

25.5

%

11,865

 

21.9

%

Total revenues

 

57,160

 

100.0

%

54,160

 

100.0

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cost of revenues:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cost of product revenues

 

17,836

 

31.2

%

19,265

 

35.6

%

Cost of services and other revenues

 

7,674

 

13.4

%

7,309

 

13.5

%

Total cost of revenues

 

25,510

 

44.6

%

26,574

 

49.1

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gross profit

 

31,650

 

55.4

%

27,586

 

50.9

%

Operating expenses:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Research and development

 

4,840

 

8.5

%

4,565

 

8.4

%

Selling, general and administrative

 

25,781

 

45.1

%

21,512

 

39.7

%

Total operating expenses

 

30,621

 

53.6

%

26,077

 

48.1

%

Income from operations

 

1,029

 

1.8

%

1,509

 

2.8

%

Interest and other income, net

 

54

 

0.1

%

74

 

0.1

%

Income before provision for income taxes

 

1,083

 

1.9

%

1,583

 

2.9

%

Provision for income taxes

 

413

 

0.7

%

604

 

1.1

%

Net income

 

$

670

 

1.2

%

$

979

 

1.8

%

 

Product Revenues, Cost of Product Revenues and Gross Profit

 

The table below shows our product revenues, cost of product revenues and gross profit for the three months ended March 31, 2011 and 2010 and the percentage change between those quarters:

 

 

 

Three Months Ended March 31,

 

 

 

2011

 

2010

 

% Change

 

 

 

(in thousands, except for percentages)

 

Product revenues

 

$

42,575

 

$

42,295

 

0.7

%

Cost of product revenues

 

17,836

 

19,265

 

(7.4

)%

Gross profit

 

$

24,739

 

$

23,030

 

7.4

%

 

The timing of our product revenues is primarily dependent on when our customers’ schedules allow for installation. Product revenues increased modestly by $0.3 million or 0.7% in the three months ended March 31, 2011 as compared to the same period in 2010.

 

Cost of product revenues decreased by $1.4 million, or 7.4% in the three months ended March 31, 2011 as compared to the same period in 2010.  The decrease was primarily due to lower material costs from our cost reduction efforts and to favorable product mix.

 

Gross profit on product revenue increased by $1.7 million, or 7.4% in the three months ended March 31, 2011 as compared to the same period in 2010. This increase was primarily a result of the aforementioned decreases in product cost, as revenue growth provided only $0.3 million of the improved margins.

 

We expect total revenues to increase between 8% to 10% in 2011, but we do not foresee any significant changes in the percentage of total revenues represented by product revenue or our gross margin beyond normal fluctuations caused by changes in product mix.

 

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Service and Other Revenues, Cost of Service and Other Revenues and Gross Profit

 

The table below shows our service and other revenues, cost of service and other revenues and gross profit for the three months ended March 31, 2011 and 2010 and the percentage change between those quarters:

 

 

 

Three Months Ended March 31,

 

 

 

2011

 

2010

 

% Change

 

 

 

(in thousands, except for percentages)

 

Service and other revenues

 

$

14,585

 

$

11,865

 

22.9

%

Cost of service and other revenues

 

7,674

 

7,309

 

5.0

%

Gross profit

 

$

6,911

 

$

4,556

 

51.7

%

 

Service and other revenues include revenues from service and maintenance contracts, rentals of automation systems, training and professional services.  Service and other revenues increased by $2.7 million, or 22.9% in the three months ended March 31, 2011 as compared to the same period in 2010.  The increase in service and other revenues was primarily the result of an expansion in our installed base of automation systems and a resulting increase in the number of support service contracts. Additional factors affecting the current quarter include higher professional service revenues, growth in analytical services and support, and higher month-to-month rentals.

 

Cost of service and other revenues increased by $0.4 million, or 5.0% in the three months ended March 31, 2011 as compared to the same period in 2010.  The increase was primarily due to an increase in field service costs in support of the expanded service base.

 

Gross profit on service and other revenues increased by $2.4 million, or 51.7% in the three months ended March 31, 2011 as compared to the same period in 2010.  The increase in gross profit on service and other revenues was due to increased revenues from an expanded installed base without a significant and proportional growth in service cost. We expect our gross profit on service and other revenues to remain consistent in 2011.

 

Operating Expenses

 

 

 

Three Months Ended March 31,

 

 

 

2011

 

2010

 

% Change

 

 

 

(in thousands, except for percentages)

 

Research and development

 

$

4,840

 

$

4,565

 

6.0

%

Selling, general and administrative

 

25,781

 

21,512

 

19.8

%

Total operating expenses

 

$

30,621

 

$

26,077

 

17.4

%

 

Research and Development. Research and development expenses increased by $0.3 million, or 6.0% in the three months ended March 31, 2011 as compared to the same period in 2010.  The increase was due primarily to a $0.9 million increase in compensation costs related to increased staffing, $0.4 million increased facilities offset by the $0.9 million higher amount of expenses capitalized for software development. This increased from $0.9 million for the first quarter 2010 to $1.8 million for the first quarter 2011, due to the higher level of beta testing for new product features in the current period. Research and development expenses represented 8.5% and 8.4% of total revenues in the three months ended March 31, 2011 and 2010, respectively.

 

We expect gross research and development expenses to increase slightly as a percentage of our revenue and grow in absolute dollars in the future as our revenue grows to improve and enhance our existing technologies and to create new technologies in health care automation. However, the net research and development costs expensed to operations in any period may vary based on the extent of software development eligible for capitalization.

 

Selling, General and Administrative. Selling, general and administrative expenses increased by $4.3 million or 19.8%  in the three months ended March 31, 2011 compared to the same period in 2010.  Selling, general and administrative expenses represented 45.1% and 39.7% of total revenues in the three months ended March 31, 2011 and 2010, respectively.  Selling, general and administrative expenses for the quarter ended March 31, 2011 as compared with the comparable period in the prior year included increased salary and benefits of $2.7 million, primarily related to expanded direct sales force hired in late 2010, and a litigation settlement accrual of $1.0 million with related legal fees of $0.5 million.

 

We expect selling, general and administrative expenses to stabilize in absolute dollars, excluding the one-time litigation settlement and related legal costs.

 

Share-based Compensation

 

The impact of share-based compensation on our operating results for the three months ended March 31, 2011 is discussed in Note 14, Stock Option Plans and Share-Based Compensation

 

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Provision for Income Taxes

 

We provide for income taxes for each interim period based on the estimated annual effective tax rate for the year, adjusting for discrete items in the quarter in which they arise. The annualized effective tax rates before discrete items were 42% and 51% for the three months ended March 31, 2011 and 2010, respectively. The 2011 annualized effective tax rate differed from the statutory rate of 35% primarily due to the impact of state income taxes, non-deductible equity charges under ASC 740-718, and the federal research credit. The 2010 annualized effective tax rate differed from the statutory rate of 35% primarily due to the impact of state income taxes and non-deductible equity charges under ASC 740-718. Our effective tax rate for the three-month periods ended March 31, 2011 and 2010 was approximately 38% for both periods. Net discrete income tax benefits for the three months ended March 31, 2011 and 2010 consisted primarily of stock compensation disqualifying dispositions.

 

Liquidity and Capital Resources

 

We had cash and cash equivalents, plus short-term investments, of $181.8 million at March 31, 2011, as compared to $183.7 million at December 31, 2010.  All of our cash is in low risk short term money market funds or demand deposits, plus we have $8.1 million short term investments held as California revenue anticipation notes.  We have no long term investments.  We believe our current cash and cash equivalent balances and cash flows generated by operations will be sufficient to satisfy our anticipated cash needs for working capital and capital expenditures for at least the next twelve months.

 

Cash flows for the three months ended March 31, 2011 and 2010 consisted of the following (in thousands):

 

 

 

Three Months Ended March 31,

 

 

 

2011

 

2010

 

Net cash provided by operating activities

 

$

3,115

 

$

8.816

 

Net cash used in investing activities

 

(4,271

)

(2,756

)

Net cash (used in) provided by financing activities

 

(810

)

5,321

 

Net (decrease) increase in cash and cash equivalents

 

$

(1,966

)

$

11,381

 

 

Operating activities provided $3.1 million of cash during the three months ended March 31, 2011, compared to $8.8 million for the three months ended March 31, 2010.  The two primary drivers for the $5.7 million reduction in cash generated from operations in these two quarters were the $5.9 million dollar difference in the change in inventory, in anticipation of several product introductions in May 2011, and a $2.9 million decrease in cash flow from the change in deferred gross profit. This decrease was partially offset in the current quarter by a $2.2 million cash flow increase from collections of accounts receivable and the non-cash effect of the $1.0 million litigation settlement.

 

We used $4.3 million of cash for investing activities during the three months ended March 31, 2011, an increase of $1.5 million over the cash used for investing activities during the three months ended March 31, 2010, primarily due to a $0.9 million increase in spending in the current quarter for beta testing of several new software applications for external use, and a $0.5 million increase in spending on property and equipment and internal patent acquisition.

 

Cash used in financing activities was $0.8 million during the three months ended March 31, 2011, as compared to cash generation of $5.3 million during the three months ended March 31, 2010.  Cash usage in the three months ended March 31, 2011 included $4.7 million spent to acquire our stock under our stock repurchase program in the period as compared to no such activities in the year-ago period. Additionally, cash generated from exercises of stock options was $1.4 million lower during three months ended March 31, 2011 compared to the prior year period.

 

Contractual Obligations

 

There have been no material changes to our contractual obligations during the three months ended March 31, 2011.  Please refer to our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2010 for a description of our facility leases and contractual obligations and the Notes to the consolidated financial statements included therein.

 

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The following table summarizes our contractual obligations at March 31, 2011 (in thousands):

 

 

 

Total

 

Less than one
year

 

One to three
years

 

Three to five
years

 

More than
five years

 

Operating leases(1)

 

$

5,865

 

$

3,822

 

$

1,601

 

$

442

 

$

 

Commitments to contract manufacturers and suppliers(2)

 

5,796

 

5,796

 

 

 

 

Total

 

$

11,661

 

$

9,618

 

$

1,601

 

$

442

 

$

 

 


(1)           Commitments under operating leases relate primarily to leasehold property and office equipment.  For the remaining nine months of 2011, we have $0.3 million of non-cancellable sublease income

 

(2)           We purchase components from a variety of suppliers and use contract manufacturers to provide manufacturing services for our products. During the normal course of business, we issue purchase orders with estimates of our requirements several months ahead of the delivery dates. We record a liability for firm, non-cancelable and unconditional purchase commitments.

 

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

 

As of March 31, 2011, we had no off-balance sheet arrangements as defined under Regulation S-K 303(a)(4) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, and the instructions thereto.

 

ITEM 3.     QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

 

As of March 31, 2011, there were no material changes to our disclosures to market risk from the disclosures set forth under the caption, “Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk” in Part II, Item 7A of our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2010.

 

ITEM 4.     CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

 

Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures

 

Disclosure Controls and Procedures

 

Our management, with the participation of our chief executive officer and chief financial officer, evaluated the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended) as of March 31, 2011.  Based on such evaluation, our chief executive officer and chief financial officer have concluded that our efforts to remediate the material weakness described below and identified by the same evaluation conducted at December 31, 2010 and set forth in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2010 were not yet completed, and therefore our disclosure controls and procedures as of March 31, 2011 were not effective to ensure that the information required to be disclosed by us in the reports that we file with the SEC is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the SEC’s rules and instructions for such reports.

 

Notwithstanding the above-mentioned material weakness, we believe that the consolidated financial statements included in this report fairly present our consolidated financial position as of March 31, 2011, and consolidated results of operations and cash flows for the three months ended March 31, 2011 and 2010.

 

Changes in Internal Control Over Financial Reporting

 

A material weakness is a deficiency, or combination of control deficiencies, in internal control over financial reporting, such that there is a reasonable possibility that a material misstatement of the company’s interim or annual financial statements will not be prevented or detected on a timely basis.

 

In the year ended December 31, 2010, we identified one material weakness in our internal control over financial reporting as of that date, related to our accounting for income taxes. Specifically, our processes, procedures and controls related to the preparation and review of the annual tax provision were not effective to ensure that amounts recorded for the tax provision and the related current and deferred income tax asset and liability accounts were accurate and determined in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles.  Additionally, we did not maintain effective controls over the review and analysis of supporting work papers for such tax balances.

 

We are in the process of implementing remediation actions designed to address this material weakness.

 

Other than the material weakness noted above, there have been no changes in our internal control over financial reporting during the three months ended March 31, 2011 that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

 

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PART II    OTHER INFORMATION

 

Item 1.       LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

 

Legal Proceedings

 

Medacist Solutions Group, LLC .  On July 8, 2009, Medacist Solutions Group LLC filed a complaint against Omnicell in U.S. District Court in the Southern District of New York, entitled Medacist Solutions Group LLC v. Omnicell, Inc., case number 09 CV 6128, alleging infringement of Medacist’s U.S. Patent Number 6,842,736. The complaint also, among other claims, alleges that Omnicell breached the terms of a nondisclosure agreement it had entered into with Medacist, and that Omnicell misappropriated Medacist’s trade secrets and confidential information in violation of the NDA. Medacist is seeking unspecified monetary damages and an injunction against the Company’s infringement of the specified patent and/or misuse of any of Medacist’s trade secrets pursuant to the NDA or in violation of California code. Omnicell has responded to the complaint, denies the claims, and intends to defend the matter vigorously.

 

On October 20, 2010, the Company filed a declaratory judgment complaint against Medacist Solutions Group, LLC in the U.S. District Court in the Northern District of California, entitled Omnicell, Inc. and Pandora Data Systems, Inc. v. Medacist Solutions Group, LLC, Case Number 10-cv-4746 (the “California Action”).  Pandora Data Systems, Inc. had entered into a Settlement and License Agreement with Medacist in October 2008 (the “Settlement Agreement”) pursuant to which, among other things, Medacist granted to Pandora a non-exclusive license to Medacist’s U.S. Patent Number 6,842,736.  The Company seeks an order declaring that Omnicell, as now-owner of Pandora Data Systems, Inc., is entitled to certain rights and benefits under the license.  On November 12, 2010, Medacist filed a motion to dismiss the California Action, or in the alternative, to transfer venue to the U.S. District Court for the District of Connecticut.  On February 10, 2011, the Court granted Medacist’s motion and dismissed the California Action without prejudice.  On February 14, 2011, Omnicell and Pandora filed a notice of appeal regarding dismissal of the California Action with the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit (the “California Appeal”).  The California Appeal is now pending.  Also on November 12, 2010, Medacist filed a motion in the U.S. District Court in the District of Connecticut to reopen a litigation entitled Medacist Solutions Group, LLC v. Pandora Data Systems, Inc., Case Number 3:07-CV-00692(JCH) (the “Connecticut Litigation”), which had been dismissed and administratively closed since October 29, 2008.  Medacist seeks, among other things, relief from the Stipulation of Dismissal entered on October 29, 2008 dismissing the Connecticut Litigation for the limited purpose of interpreting and enforcing the Settlement Agreement, the entry of a temporary restraining order and preliminary and permanent injunctions prohibiting breaches of the Settlement Agreement, a finding that Pandora breached the Settlement Agreement and an award of monetary damages resulting from Pandora’s alleged breaches.  On December 3, 2010, the Company and Pandora filed a response to this motion.  At this time, the Connecticut Litigation remains closed, and no hearings have been scheduled on Medacist’s motion.

 

As of March 31, 2011, we reached a tentative settlement agreement with Medacist, pursuant to which the Company agreed to pay Medacist $1.0 million in exchange for a fully-paid, perpetual license to Medacist’s patented technology and the parties agreed to dismiss all pending lawsuits and fully release each other from all claims.  In addition, we agreed that a license transfer fee payment of $0.5 million would be made to Medacist in the event certain change-in-control conditions are met. While the tentative agreement substantiates that the contingent loss is both probable and estimable for accrual in the first quarter of 2011, the final settlement would be effective only after all terms are negotiated and executed in formal documents, which has yet to occur. The $1.0 million contingent loss for this settlement was recorded within selling, general and administrative expenses during the three months ended March 31,  2011.

 

As required under ASC 450, “Contingencies,” we accrue for contingencies when we believe that a loss is probable and that we can reasonably estimate the amount of any such loss. We have made an assessment of the probability of incurring any such losses and such amounts are reflected in accrued liabilities in our consolidated financial statements. Except as otherwise indicated above, we believe that the outcomes in these matters are not probable or reasonably estimable. We believe that we have valid defenses with respect to legal matters pending against us. However, litigation is inherently unpredictable, and it is possible that cash flows or results of operations could be materially affected in any particular period by the unfavorable resolution of one or more of these contingencies or because of the diversion of management’s attention and the creation of significant expenses

 

Item 1A.     RISK FACTORS

 

We have identified the following risks and uncertainties that may have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition or results of operations. Our business faces significant risks and the risks described below may not be the only risks we face. Additional risks not presently known to us or that we currently believe are immaterial may also significantly impair our business operations. If any of these risks occur, our business, results of operations or financial condition could suffer and the market price of our common stock could decline.

 

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Unfavorable economic and market conditions, a decreased demand in the capital equipment market and uncertainty regarding the rollout of government legislation in the healthcare industry could adversely affect our operating results.

 

Our operating results have been and may continue to be adversely affected by unfavorable global economic and market conditions as well as a lessening demand in the capital equipment market. Customer demand for our products is significantly linked to the strength of the economy. If demand for capital equipment caused by weak economic conditions and decreased corporate and government spending, deferrals or delays of capital equipment projects, longer time frames for capital equipment purchasing decisions and generally reduced expenditures for capital solutions continues, we will experience decreased revenues and lower revenue growth rates and our operating results could be materially and adversely affected.

 

Additionally, as the U.S. Federal government rolls out and implements recently enacted healthcare reform legislation, there may be an impact on our business. Healthcare facilities may decide to postpone or scale back spending until the implications of such healthcare reform legislation are more clearly understood, which may affect the demand for our products and harm our business.

 

The medication management and supply chain solutions market is highly competitive and we may be unable to compete successfully against new entrants and established companies with greater resources.

 

The medication management and supply chain solutions market is intensely competitive. We expect continued and increased competition from current and future competitors, many of which have significantly greater financial, technical, marketing and other resources than we do. Our current direct competitors in the medication management and supply chain solutions market include CareFusion Corporation (a spinoff from Cardinal Health, Inc., which includes Pyxis Corporation), McKesson Automation Inc. (a business unit of McKesson Corporation), AmerisourceBergen Corporation (through its acquisition of MedSelect, Inc. and Automed), Cerner Corporation, Emerson Electronic Co. (through its acquisitions of Flo Healthcare LLC, Lionville Systems, Inc. and medDispense), MDG Medical, PhACTs LLC, Talyst, Inc., Stinger Medical, Stanley Black and Decker (through their acquisition of InfoLogix, Inc),. Ergotron, Inc., Capso Solutions, (through their acquisition of Artromick International, Inc.), Rubbermaid Medical Solutions (a business unit of Newell Rubbermaid Inc), WaveMark Inc., ParExcellence Systems, Inc. and Lawson Software, Inc.

 

The competitive challenges we face in the medication management and supply chain solutions market include, but are not limited to, the following:

 

·                   our competitors may develop, license or incorporate new or emerging technologies or devote greater resources to the development, promotion and sale of their products and services;

 

·                   certain competitors have greater brand name recognition and a more extensive installed base of medication and supply dispensing systems or other products and services than we do, and such advantages could be used to increase their market share;

 

·                   other established or emerging companies may enter the medication management and supply chain solutions market;

 

·                   certain competitors may develop new features or capabilities for their products not previously offered that could compete directly with our products;

 

·                   current and potential competitors may make strategic acquisitions or establish cooperative relationships among themselves or with third parties, including larger, more established healthcare supply companies, thereby increasing their ability to develop and offer products and services to address the needs of our prospective customers; and

 

·                   our competitors may secure products and services from suppliers on more favorable terms or secure exclusive arrangements with suppliers or buyers that may impede the sales of our products and services.

 

Competitive pressures could result in increased price competition for our products and services, fewer customer orders and reduced gross margins, any of which could harm our business.

 

Any reduction in the demand for or adoption of our medication and supply dispensing systems and related services would reduce our revenues.

 

Our medication and supply dispensing systems represent only one approach to managing the distribution of pharmaceuticals and supplies at healthcare facilities. A significant portion of domestic and international healthcare facilities still use traditional approaches in some form that do not include fully automated methods of medication and supply dispensing management. As a result, we must continuously educate existing and prospective customers about the advantages of our products, which requires significant

 

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sales efforts and can cause longer sales cycles. Despite our significant efforts and extensive time commitments in sales to healthcare facilities, we cannot be assured that our efforts will result in sales to these customers.

 

In addition, our medication and supply dispensing systems typically represent a sizeable initial capital expenditure for healthcare organizations. Changes in the budgets of these organizations and the timing of spending under these budgets can have a significant effect on the demand for our medication and supply dispensing systems and related services. These budgets are often supported by cash flows that can be negatively affected by declining investment income, and influenced by limited resources, increased operational and financing costs, macroeconomic conditions such as unemployment rates and conflicting spending priorities among different departments. Any decrease in expenditures by healthcare facilities could decrease demand for our medication and supply dispensing systems and related services and reduce our revenues.

 

Changing customer requirements could decrease the demand for our products and services and our new product solutions may not achieve market acceptance.

 

The medication management and supply chain solutions market is characterized by evolving technologies and industry standards, frequent new product introductions and dynamic customer requirements that may render existing products obsolete or less competitive. The medication management and supply chain solutions market could erode rapidly due to unforeseen changes in the features and functions of competing products, as well as the pricing models for such products. Our future success will depend in part upon our ability to enhance our existing products and services and to develop and introduce new products and services to meet changing customer requirements. The process of developing products and services such as those we offer is extremely complex and is expected to become increasingly more complex and expensive in the future as new technologies are introduced. If we are unable to enhance our existing products or develop new products to meet changing customer requirements, demand for our products could decrease.

 

In the second quarter of 2011, we announced the G4 platform, the Savvy™ Mobile Medication System, SinglePointe™, Tissue Center System, and Anywhere RN™. We cannot assure you that we will be successful in marketing these or any new products or services, that new products or services will compete effectively with similar products or services sold by our competitors or that the level of market acceptance of such products or services will be sufficient to generate expected revenues and synergies with our other products or services. Deployment of new products or services often requires interoperability with other Omnicell products or services as well as with healthcare facilities’ existing information management systems. If these products or services fail to satisfy these demanding technological objectives, our customers may be dissatisfied and we may be unable to generate future sales.

 

Our current and potential customers may have other business relationships with our competitors and consider those relationships when deciding between our products and services and those of our competitors.

 

Many of our competitors are large companies that sell a variety of products and services into the healthcare market to our current and potential customers and may be better positioned to sell products with similar functionality. As a result, if a potential customer is a customer of one of these competitors, the customer may be motivated to purchase medication and supply dispensing systems or other automation solutions from our competitor in order to maintain or enhance their business relationship with that competitor, regardless of the products’ performance or capabilities.

 

If we experience delays in installations of our medication and supply dispensing systems, or delays in the recognition of revenue associated with our medication and supply dispensing systems, our competitive position, results of operations and financial condition could be harmed.

 

The purchase of our medication and supply dispensing systems is often part of a customer’s larger initiative to re-engineer its pharmacy, distribution and materials management systems and as a result, our sales cycles are often lengthy. The purchase of our medication and supply dispensing systems often entail larger strategic purchases by customers that frequently require more complex and stringent contractual requirements and generally involves a significant commitment of management attention and resources by prospective customers. These larger and more complex transactions often require the input and approval of many decision-makers, including pharmacy directors, materials managers, nurse managers, financial managers, information systems managers, administrators, lawyers and boards of directors. For these and other reasons, the sales cycle associated with the sale of our medication and supply dispensing systems is often lengthy and subject to a number of delays over which we have little or no control. A delay in, or loss of, sales of our medication and supply dispensing systems could have an adverse affect upon our operating results and could harm our business.

 

In addition, and in part as a result of the complexities inherent in larger transactions, the average time between the purchase and installation of our systems has increased over the past few years for reasons that are often outside of our control. Since we

 

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recognize revenue only upon installation of our systems at a customer’s site, any delay in installation by our customers or delays in the determination that the earnings process is complete also causes a delay in the recognition of revenue for that system.

 

We may not be able to successfully integrate acquired businesses or technologies into our existing business, which could negatively impact our operating results.

 

As a part of our business strategy we may seek to acquire businesses, technologies or products in the future.  We cannot assure you that any acquisition or any future transaction we complete will result in long-term benefits to us or our stockholders, or that our management will be able to integrate or manage the acquired business effectively. Acquisitions entail numerous risks, including difficulties associated with the integration of operations, technologies, products and personnel that, if realized, could harm our operating results. Risks related to potential acquisitions include, but are not limited to:

 

·                   difficulties in combining previously separate businesses into a single unit;

 

·                   the substantial costs that may be incurred and the substantial diversion of management’s attention from day-to-day business when evaluating and negotiating such transactions and then integrating an acquired business;

 

·                   discovery, after completion of the acquisition, of liabilities assumed from the acquired business or of assets acquired that are broader in scope and magnitude or are more difficult to manage than originally assumed;

 

·                   failure to achieve anticipated benefits such as cost savings and revenue enhancements;

 

·                   difficulties related to assimilating the products of an acquired business; and

 

·                   failure to understand and compete effectively in markets in which we have limited previous experience.

 

If we are unable to recruit and retain skilled and motivated personnel, our competitive position, results of operations and financial condition could be harmed.

 

Our success is highly dependent upon the continuing contributions of our key management, sales, technical and engineering staff. We believe that our future success will depend upon our ability to attract, train and retain highly skilled and motivated personnel. As more of our products are installed in increasingly complex environments, greater technical expertise will be required. As our installed base of customers increases, we will also face additional demands on our customer service and support personnel, requiring additional resources to meet these demands. We may experience difficulty in recruiting qualified personnel. Competition for qualified technical, engineering, managerial, sales, marketing, financial reporting and other personnel can be intense and we cannot assure you that we will be successful in attracting and retaining qualified personnel. Competitors have in the past attempted, and may in the future attempt, to recruit our employees.

 

In addition, we have historically used stock options, restricted stock units and other forms of equity compensation as key components of our employee compensation program in order to align employees’ interests with the interests of our stockholders, encourage employee retention and provide competitive compensation packages. The effect of managing share-based compensation expense may make it less favorable for us to grant stock options, restricted stock units, or other forms of equity compensation, to employees in the future. In order to continue granting equity compensation at competitive levels, we must seek stockholder approval for any increases to the number of shares reserved for issuance under our equity incentive plans and we cannot assure you that we will receive such approvals. Any failure to receive approval for proposed increases could prevent us from granting equity compensation at market competitive levels and make it more difficult to attract, retain and motivate employees.  Further, to the extent that we expand our business or product lines through the acquisition of other businesses, any failure to receive any such approvals could prevent us from securing employment commitments from such newly acquired employees.  Failure to attract and retain key personnel could harm our competitive position, results of operations and financial condition.

 

If we are unable to make effective use of our increased sales staff, we will have higher expenses without the benefits of increased market penetration and profitable sales growth.

 

During the last six months, we have increased direct territory sales staff by approximately 30%. We expect an increase in the sales productivity of these new hires as they are trained and begin to develop sales leads in their assigned territories, however, there is no guarantee that this increased sales staff will result in a proportional increase in new business. If we encounter obstacles to the effectiveness of our sales staff, we will adjust our efforts to support their success, and this may result in higher expenses without corresponding increases in market penetration or sales growth.

 

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We have experienced substantial changes in our annual revenue based on customer demand and we cannot be sure that we will be able to respond proactively to future changes in customer demand.

 

Our revenue increased by $8.9 million or 4.2% to $222.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2010 compared to $213.5 million for 2009. However, revenues for the year ended December 31, 2009 declined by $38.4 million or 15.2% from $251.9 million in 2008.

 

Current macroeconomic and general market conditions have contributed to revenue volatility and an overall decline in our revenues from 2008 levels. Our ability to adjust to rapid reductions in our revenue while still achieving or sustaining profitability is dependent upon our ability to manage costs and control expenses. If macroeconomic and general market conditions improve and return to historical levels, our ability to grow revenue and profitability will also be dependent on our ability to continue to manage costs and control expenses. If our revenue increases rapidly, we may not be able to manage this growth effectively. Future growth is dependent on our ability to continue to receive orders from customers, the volume of installations we are able to complete, our ability to continue to meet our customers’ needs and provide a quality installation experience and our flexibility in manpower allocations among customers to complete installations on a timely basis.

 

Our expense control is dependent on our ability to continue to develop and leverage effective and efficient human and information technology systems, our ability to gain efficiencies in our workforce through the local and worldwide labor markets and our ability to grow our outsourced vendor supply model. Our expense growth rate may equal or exceed our revenue growth rate if we are unable to streamline our operations, or fail to reduce the costs or increase the margins of our products. In addition, we may not be able to reduce our expenses to keep pace with a reduction in our revenue, which could harm our results of operations and financial position.

 

Due to the lack of available credit opportunities, some of our customers may experience more difficulty in securing funds from third-parties to purchase our products, which could adversely affect the demand for our products or require us to extend credit terms to our customers.

 

Many of the products we sell and lease to our customers are capital equipment, and many of those customers finance their large capital equipment purchases or leases with funds secured from third-party lenders. Any deterioration in the general economic climate and in the credit market could make it more difficult for our customers to secure financing on large capital equipment transactions such as ours. To the extent that a tightening in the credit market results in difficulty for our customers in financing purchases or leases of our products from third-parties, demand for our products could decline and in order to sell our products, we may be required to extend credit to certain customers, which would negatively impact our cash balances, affect the classification of our short and long-term receivables and increase the risk of collections from such customers.

 

Our quarterly operating results may fluctuate and may cause our stock price to decline.

 

Our quarterly operating results may vary in the future depending on many factors that include, but are not limited to, the following:

 

·                   our ability to successfully install our products on a timely basis and meet other contractual obligations necessary to recognize revenue;

 

·                   the size, product mix and timing of orders for our medication and supply dispensing systems, and their installation and integration;

 

·                   the overall demand for healthcare medication management and supply chain solutions;

 

·                   changes in pricing policies by us or our competitors;

 

·                   the number, timing and significance of product enhancements and new product announcements by us or our competitors;

 

·                   the timing and significance of any acquisition or business development transactions that we may consider or negotiate and the revenues, costs and earnings that may be associated with these transactions;

 

·                   the relative proportions of revenues we derive from products and services;

 

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·                   fluctuations in the percentage of sales attributable to our international business;

 

·                   our customers’ budget cycles;

 

·                   changes in our operating expenses and our ability to stabilize expenses;

 

·                   our ability to generate cash from our accounts receivable on a timely basis;

 

·                   the performance of our products;

 

·                   changes in our business strategy;

 

·                   macroeconomic and political conditions, including fluctuations in interest rates, tax increases and availability of credit markets; and

 

·                   volatility in our stock price and its effect on equity-based compensation expense.

 

Due to all of these factors, our quarterly revenues and operating results are difficult to predict and may fluctuate, which in turn may cause the market price of our stock to decline.

 

If we are unable to maintain our relationships with group purchasing organizations or other similar organizations, we may have difficulty selling our products and services.

 

We sell our products through a number of group purchasing organizations, including AmeriNet, Inc., Broadlane Inc., HealthTrust Purchasing Group, L.P., MedAssets Supply Chain Systems, Novation, LLC, Premier, Inc., and Resources Optimization & Innovation. We have also contracted with the United States General Services Administration, allowing the Department of Veteran Affairs, the Department of Defense and other Federal Government customers to purchase our products. These contracts enable us to more readily sell our products and services to customers represented by these organizations. Some of our contracts with these organizations are terminable at the convenience of either party. The loss of any of these relationships could impact the breadth of our customer base and could impair our ability to meet our revenue targets or increase our revenues. We cannot assure you that these organizations will renew our contracts on similar terms, if at all, and they may choose to terminate our contracts before they expire.

 

The healthcare industry faces financial constraints and consolidation that could adversely affect the demand for our products and services.

 

The healthcare industry has faced, and will likely continue to face, significant financial constraints. For example, the shift to managed care in the 1990s put pressure on healthcare organizations to reduce costs, and the Balanced Budget Act of 1997 significantly reduced Medicare reimbursement to healthcare organizations. Recently enacted legislation such as the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act in 2009, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act in 2010 and other health reform legislation may cause customers to postpone purchases of our products while the impact of the legislation on their operations is determined. Our automation solutions often involve a significant financial commitment by our customers and, as a result, our ability to grow our business is largely dependent on our customers’ capital and operating budgets. To the extent healthcare spending declines or increases more slowly than we anticipate, demand for our products and services could decline.

 

Many healthcare providers have consolidated to create larger healthcare delivery organizations to achieve greater market power. If this consolidation continues, it could reduce the number of our target customers. In addition, the resulting organizations could have greater bargaining power, which may lead to price erosion.

 

Our disclosure controls and procedures for internal control over financial reporting were not effective as of December 31, 2010 and March 31, 2011.  Our failure to maintain effective internal control over financial reporting in accordance with Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 could cause our stock price to decline.

 

If we fail to maintain effective internal control over financial reporting, as such standards are modified, supplemented or amended from time to time, we may not be able to ensure that we can conclude on an ongoing basis that we have effective internal control over financial reporting. Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 and the related rules and regulations of the SEC require annual management assessments of the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting and a report by our independent registered public accounting firm attesting to and reporting on these assessments

 

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